Cluniac


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Related to Cluniac: Cistercian Order

Cluniac

(ˈkluːnɪˌæk)
adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to a reformed Benedictine order founded at the French town of Cluny in 910
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to a reformed Benedictine order founded at the French town of Cluny in 910
Translations

Cluniac

[ˈkluːnɪæk]
A. ADJcluniacense
B. Ncluniacense m
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References in periodicals archive ?
Aside from the seven introductory addresses that explore the apostolic constitution of the Church, Benedict also discusses the following themes: women at the service of the Gospel; monastic and scholastic forms of theology; the Cluniac reform; the architecture of Romanesque and Gothic cathedrals; and the mendicant orders.
In particular, three key points are stressed throughout the volume: the embedding of Benedictinism in secular politics; the institutional and societal development of Benectinism, together with issues of monastic leadership and autonomy; and the roots of the Cluniac reforms in longstanding institutional processes seeking a restoration of associations with highly placed patrons, particularly the counts of Flanders.
The eleventh-century church is registered as a UNESCO world heritage site and was an important Cluniac center; the commission came under the auspices of the New Patrons, an innovative program that allows anyone to commission an artwork through a mediator.
In the 12th century this was replaced by a Cluniac priory, established by Roger de Montgomerie after the Norman Conquest, of which the ruins can still be seen today and are now in the hands of the English Heritage.
It enters history in the early 8th century when Sigward, a follower of King Ethelbald of Mercia, sold his estate there to the future St Milburga, abbess of Cluniac Priory at Wenlock.
The park, just outside the town centre, was once part of the town's vast Norman Castle estate and houses the remains of the 12th century Cluniac Priory of St James and Priory Hall - once home to the Earls of Dudley.
Paisley Abbey was founded as a Cluniac priory in 1163, and became an abbey in 1245.
Silence and Sign Language in Medieval Monasticism: The Cluniac Tradition c.
He also discusses the usually polemical motivations of patrons, such as Ketton's, the Cluniac Peter the Venerable.
By the early 11th century, the abbey was the hub of a huge Cluniac federation of monasteries that were all ultimately under the authority of the abbot of Cluny.
9) Derived originally from liturgical books introduced to the cathedral by French Cluniac monks in the eleventh century, (10) the latest definitive printed record of this local use is contained in Archbishop (later Cardinal) Siliceo's Missale (1550) and Breviarium (1551).
The topology of exclusion enabled the Cluniac monk-priest to define a sociology that was also an anthropology" of dehumanization (362).