Cluniac


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Related to Cluniac: Cistercian Order

Cluniac

(ˈkluːnɪˌæk)
adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to a reformed Benedictine order founded at the French town of Cluny in 910
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to a reformed Benedictine order founded at the French town of Cluny in 910
Translations

Cluniac

[ˈkluːnɪæk]
A. ADJcluniacense
B. Ncluniacense m
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References in periodicals archive ?
The pilgrim monks who supervised the building of Paisley Abbey soon after the Knights Templar discovery of the sacred scrolls belonged to the Cluniac Order.
In 1098, fifty years after the establishing of the Carthusian Charterhouse, the Benedictines in response to extreme Carthusian asceticism on one hand and in reaction against the pomp and worldliness of the Cluniac Order on the other--the Cluniacs being a group that had set themselves apart from traditional Benedictine practice with an autocratic organization centered in the Abbey of Cluny--founded the order of Cistercians in an effort to reinstate the life of the first Benedictines at Monte Cassino.
A Cluniac influence is supported by the manuscript's transmission of chants taken from the Office of the Transfiguration composed by Peter the Venerable, Abbot of Cluny.
In other words: if the monastic movement of early Christianity and even the Cluniac revolution in the Central Middle Ages defended the escape from the world, greater respect to the rules and, with this, alienated monks from social life, the Mendicant Orders of the 13th century faced the world.
When pilgrim and guide stop running, they encounter the next cadre of sinners, the hypocrites, who move like Cluniac Benedictines, their robes leaded, their gate agonizingly slow (23.
Corman shot almost all of his Poe cycle on studio-made sets, making creative use of sound stages and matte paintings; the only exception was Ligeia, done on location in a twelfth-century Cluniac monastery--the Castle Acre Priory--in the English countryside of Norfolk:
In particular, three key points are stressed throughout the volume: the embedding of Benedictinism in secular politics; the institutional and societal development of Benectinism, together with issues of monastic leadership and autonomy; and the roots of the Cluniac reforms in longstanding institutional processes seeking a restoration of associations with highly placed patrons, particularly the counts of Flanders.
The history between Santa Maria of Najera and Calahorra was complicated (95), and had already consumed some of Gregory's attentions at the Council of Lleida (96), but the decision is particularly curious because of Santa Maria's importance as <<one of the two chief Cluniac centers in all Spain>> (97).
Cochelin's second contribution to the volume is an examination of Cluniac definitions and perceptions of adolescence in the Middle Ages.
The eleventh-century church is registered as a UNESCO world heritage site and was an important Cluniac center; the commission came under the auspices of the New Patrons, an innovative program that allows anyone to commission an artwork through a mediator.
It is believed to be the work of a friar, or possibly a Cluniac monk, at Thetford, named Roger Baldry, and until recently its existence was unknown to scholars.
In the 12th century this was replaced by a Cluniac priory, established by Roger de Montgomerie after the Norman Conquest, of which the ruins can still be seen today and are now in the hands of the English Heritage.