Clyde


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Clyde

 (klīd)
A river of southwest Scotland flowing about 171 km (106 mi) northwest to the Firth of Clyde, an estuary of the North Channel. The river is navigable to Glasgow for oceangoing vessels.

Clyde

(klaɪd)
n
1. (Placename) Firth of Clyde an inlet of the Atlantic in SW Scotland. Length: 103 km (64 miles)
2. (Placename) a river in S Scotland, rising in South Lanarkshire and flowing northwest to the Firth of Clyde: formerly extensive shipyards. Length: 170 km (106 miles)

Clyde

(klaɪd)

n.
1. a river in S Scotland, flowing NW into the Firth of Clyde. 106 mi. (170 km) long.
2. Firth of, an inlet of the Atlantic, in SW Scotland. 64 mi. (103 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Clyde - a river in western Scotland that flows from the southern uplands into the Firth of Clyde; navigable by oceangoing vessels as far as Glasgow
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
References in classic literature ?
The ship was one of those iron wool-clippers that the Clyde had floated out in swarms upon the world during the seventh decade of the last century.
Do you know--I've been looking it up--the Firth Of Clyde, where all the steel ships are built, isn't half as wide as Oakland Creek down there, where all those old hulks lie?
The first steamship line to take notice of the telephone was the Clyde, which had a wire from dock to office in 1877; and the first railway was the Pennsylvania, which two years later was persuaded by Professor Bell himself to give it a trial in Altoona.
I have on the banks of the Clyde," continued Monk, "a little house in a grove, cottage as it is called here.
For these same Stewarts, and Maccolls, and Macrobs (that had two rents to pay, one to King George by stark force, and one to Ardshiel by natural kindness) offered him a better price than any Campbell in all broad Scotland; and far he sent seeking them -- as far as to the sides of Clyde and the cross of Edinburgh -- seeking, and fleeching, and begging them to come, where there was a Stewart to be starved and a red-headed hound of a Campbell to be pleasured
I understood very well why, when he told me that he had joined in the Clyde a small steamer chartered by a relative of his, "a very wealthy man," he observed (probably Lord X, I thought), to carry arms and other supplies to the Carlist army.
The steam-yacht, built in the Clyde, and fitted with tiled bath-rooms and other unheard-of luxuries, was said to have cost him half a million; and the pearl necklace which he had presented to his wife on his return was as magnificent as such expiatory offerings are apt to be.
His time being out, he had 'worked in the shop' at weekly wages seven or eight years more; and had then betaken himself to the banks of the Clyde, where he had studied, and filed, and hammered, and improved his knowledge, theoretical and practical, for six or seven years more.
A DOG called Clyde turned fugitive for the day after escaping his home and jumping on to a train.
Staffordshire bull terrier Clyde went missing from his home in Penpedairheol, near Ystrad Mynach, at 7am last Monday - marking the start of his 21-mile adventure.
3 August 2017 - Scotland, UK-based energy company SSE plc (LSE: SSE) has signed an agreement to sell a further stake in Clyde Windfarm (Scotland) Ltd.
Target: Clyde Windfarm (Scotland) Ltd/additional 5% stake