nematocyst

(redirected from Cnidocyst)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Cnidocyst: nematocyst

nem·a·to·cyst

 (nĕm′ə-tə-sĭst′, nĭ-măt′ə-)
n.
A capsule within specialized cells in the tentacles of cnidarians, such as jellyfish and corals, containing a barbed, threadlike tube that delivers a toxic sting to predators and prey.

nem′a·to·cys′tic adj.

nematocyst

(ˈnɛmətəˌsɪst; nɪˈmætə-)
n
(Zoology) a structure in coelenterates, such as jellyfish, consisting of a capsule containing a hollow coiled thread that can be everted to sting or paralyse prey and enemies
ˌnematoˈcystic adj

nem•a•to•cyst

(ˈnɛm ə təˌsɪst, nɪˈmæt ə-)

n.
one of the tiny organs in jellyfish and other coelenterates that uncoils a threadlike poisonous stinger when irritated.
[1870–75]
nem`a•to•cys′tic, adj.

nem·a·to·cyst

(nĕm′ə-tə-sĭst′, nĭ-măt′ə-sĭst′)
One of the stinging cells in the tentacles of a jellyfish, hydra, or related animal, used to capture prey and ward off attackers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The distinctive pattern of expression of [beta]80868 by large cells in the epidermis in the oral region and in large cells scattered throughout the mesenteries does not correspond to any particular class of neuron or cnidocyte, nor to any particular kind of mini-collagen, the intracellular matrix that reinforces the walls of the cnidocyst (Marlow et al.
This complexity is evident in the elaborate architecture (Beckman and Ozbek, 2012) of the tubule that is everted from the cnidocyst found within the cells, in the venom (Calton and Burnett, 1973; Diaz-Garcia, 2012) released by the discharged tubule, and by the not fully understood mechanism that achieves discharge in a millisecond (Niichter et al.
The stinging cells, or cnidocysts, of sea anemones, jellyfish and other cnidarians contain a coiled hollow thread that unravels rapidly when triggered by physical contact.