Cnut


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Cnut

 (kə-no͞ot′, -nyo͞ot′)
See Canute.

Cnut

(kəˈnjuːt)
n
(Biography) a variant spelling of Canute

Ca•nute

(kəˈnut, -ˈnyut)

n.
A.D. 994?–1035, Danish king of England 1017–35; of Denmark 1018–35; and of Norway 1028–35.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cnut - king of Denmark and Norway who forced Edmund II to divide England with him; on the death of Edmund II, Canute became king of all England (994-1035)
References in periodicals archive ?
20 years ago Britain's favourite publican Al Murray, The Pub Landlord, embarked on his one-man mission as the King Cnut of Common Sense, 'holding back the tide of bottled beer and ninny state nonsense.
The haul, which includes ancient ingots and fragments of coins dating back almost a thousand years to the time of King Cnut the Great, was found by treasure hunter Walter Hanks from Llanllyfni using a metal detector in Llandwrog back in March.
THE palace can be traced back to the 11th century when King Cnut began building on the site.
It's now 20 years since Britain's favourite publican embarked on his oneman mission as the King Cnut of Common Sense, "holding back the tide of bottled beer and ninny state nonsense".
But in the meantime the UK's most famous Pub Landlord and "King Cnut of Common Sense", is busy with the day job, bringing his One Man, One Guvnor show to Parr Hall at Warrington.
PS22 AL MURRAY TWENTY years ago Britain's favourite publican Al Murray (right), The Pub Landlord, embarked on his one man mission as the King Cnut of Common Sense, holding back a tide of bottled beer and ninny state nonsense.
It's a backs-to-the-wall battle with the Vikings, as England falls to the invading forces of King Cnut.
Owing to his subsequent acquisition of the thrones of Britain, Denmark and Sweden, he went down in history as the Great Cnut or Canute.
When the two arrive in court, Cnut gives them the task of solving a murder and diffusing the dangerous political situation surrounding it.
A thousand years ago, King Cnut placed his throne on a beach to prove, as the encroaching sea lapped around his ankles, that even he as sovereign was not above the power of nature and could not hold back the tide.
The empire of Cnut the Great; conquest and the consolidation of power in Northern Europe in the early eleventh century.
The elaborate script appears to be based on the more cursive portion of an 11th-century Charter of Cnut in the British Library, illustrated in Edward Johnston's seminal handbook Writing & Illuminating & Lettering (1906), appropriately for this 800 year-old church and a king associated with the water's edge.