trustee

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trus·tee

 (trŭ-stē′)
n.
1. Law The person in a trust relationship who holds title to property for the benefit of another.
2. A member of a board elected or appointed to direct the funds and policy of an institution.
3. A country responsible for supervising a trust territory. See Usage Note at -ee1.
v. trus·teed, trus·tee·ing, trus·tees
v.tr.
To place (property) in the care of a trustee.
v.intr.
To function or serve as a trustee.

trustee

(trʌˈstiː)
n
1. (Law) a person to whom the legal title to property is entrusted to hold or use for another's benefit
2. (Law) a member of a board that manages the affairs and administers the funds of an institution or organization

trust•ee

(trʌˈsti)

n., v. -eed, -ee•ing. n.
1. a person appointed to administer the affairs of a company, institution, etc.
2. a person who holds title to property for the benefit of another.
3. a country that administers a trust territory.
v.i.
4. to serve as a trustee.
v.t.
5. to place in the hands of a trustee.
[1640–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trustee - a person (or institution) to whom legal title to property is entrusted to use for another's benefittrustee - a person (or institution) to whom legal title to property is entrusted to use for another's benefit
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
fiduciary - a person who holds assets in trust for a beneficiary; "it is illegal for a fiduciary to misappropriate money for personal gain"
2.trustee - members of a governing boardtrustee - members of a governing board  
governing board - a board that manages the affairs of an institution
committee member - a member of a committee

trustee

noun administrator, agent, keeper, custodian, executor, fiduciary (Law), depository, executrix, steward Astonishingly, the trustees don't know where the money is either.
Translations
وَكيل، وَصي، قَيِّم
správce
formueforvalterværge
fjárhaldsmaîur
splnomocnenecsprávca majetku
güvenilir kişiyediemin

trustee

[trʌsˈtiː] N (in bankruptcy) → síndico m; (= holder of property for another) → fideicomisario/a m/f, depositario/a m/f, administrador(a) m/f; [of college] → regente/a m/f

trustee

[trʌˈstiː] n
(LAW)fidéicommissaire m
[school] → administrateur/trice m/f

trustee

n
(of estate)Treuhänder(in) m(f), → Vermögensverwalter(in) m(f)
(of institution)Kurator(in) m(f), → Verwalter(in) m(f); trusteesVorstand m; Trustee Savings Bank˜ Sparkasse f

trustee

[trʌsˈtiː]
1. n (Law) → amministratore/trice fiduciario/a; (of school, institution) → amministratore/trice

trust

(trast) verb
1. to have confidence or faith; to believe. She trusted (in) him.
2. to give (something to someone), believing that it will be used well and responsibly. I can't trust him with my car; I can't trust my car to him.
3. to hope or be confident (that). I trust (that) you had / will have a good journey.
noun
1. belief or confidence in the power, reality, truth, goodness etc of a person or thing. The firm has a great deal of trust in your ability; trust in God.
2. charge or care; responsibility. The child was placed in my trust.
3. a task etc given to a person by someone who believes that they will do it, look after it etc well. He holds a position of trust in the firm.
4. arrangement(s) by which something (eg money) is given to a person to use in a particular way, or to keep until a particular time. The money was to be held in trust for his children; (also adjective) a trust fund
5. a group of business firms working together. The companies formed a trust.
ˌtrusˈtee noun
a person who keeps and takes care of something (especially money or property) for some one else.
ˈtrustworthy adjective
(negative untrustworthy) worthy of trust. Is your friend trustworthy?
ˈtrustworthiness noun
ˈtrusty adjective
able to be trusted or depended on. trusty sword; a trusty friend.
ˈtrustily adverb
ˈtrustiness noun
References in classic literature ?
Veneering launching himself upon this trustee as his oldest friend (which makes seven, Twemlow thought), and confidentially retiring with him into the conservatory, it is understood that Veneering is his co-trustee, and that they are arranging about the fortune.
Donald Sterling was formerly a co-trustee but was stripped of the title after two neurologists certified that he is suffering from dementia and "mentally incapacitated" which was a violation of the trust's conditions.
When a co-owner dies, the surviving owner will normally add the deceased's personal representatives to the title as co-trustee.
While most of the discussion centers on the US, concluding chapters examine PTD abroad, the global public trust, and the concept of co-trustee management.
Furthermore, as described below, unless the deemed owner is the trustee or a co-trustee, filing Forms 1099 does not negate the trustees duty to prepare the grantor tax information letter and send it to the deemed owner to be reported on his or her personal return.
During the court proceedings, Robert Rominoff's lawyers claimed that GHC Corp is "99 percent owned by the trust of which Robert is co-trustee and sole beneficiary," and that his father is interfering with his right to redeem the mortgage.
That is often difficult to do, but in the trust, a parent can appoint a family member or friend to act as a co-trustee with your children for a few years to provide guidance on good money management.
Co-trustee Rosie Brady, of Wyken, Coventry, who is partially-sighted, added: "It has made life so much easier for us.
Northgate, The Bank of New York Mellon, as trustee (the "Trustee"), and BNY Trust Company of Canada, as co-trustee (the "Co-Trustee"), have entered into the Indenture, dated as of October 5, 2010 (the "Base Indenture"), as supplemented by the First Supplemental Indenture, dated as of October 5, 2010 (the "First Supplemental Indenture"), among Northgate, the Trustee and the Co-Trustee, and further supplemented by the Second Supplemental Indenture, dated as of October 26, 2011, among AuRico, Northgate, the Trustee and the Co-Trustee (the "Second Supplemental Indenture" and, collectively with the Base Indenture and the Second Supplemental Indenture, the "Indenture").
The co-trustee can step in if the surviving spouse becomes incapacitated or loses interest in managing the trust.
A corporate Co-Trustee can be named, granted removal power and be required to appoint a successor Co-Trustee named in the Trust.
Further, the legislation allows for the delegation of investment functions to a qualified co-trustee even if the settlor reasonably expected the co-trustees to perform certain functions jointly; and applies the fiduciary delegation rules of [section]518.