Coadjustment

Co`ad`just´ment


n.1.Mutual adjustment.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two participants were excluded from analyses because a single phthalate metabolite was missing because of analytic interference; because our statistical approach involved coadjustment for all phthalate metabolites, they were dropped from the model.
Coadjustment for ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and other air pollutants that are significantly elevated on thunderstorm days did not significiantly change the effect of fungal spores.
In part 1, she uses game theory to develop a useful typology of cooperation problems: (1) coincidence, where common interests naturally lead to cooperation; (2) coercion, where divergent interests require the leading sender to use threats and promises to alter the preferences of others; and (3) coadjustment, where the mix of convergent and divergent interests requires coordination.
They are skeptical of nonhegemonic cooperation, even if there are convergent interests (coadjustment games), because considerations of "relative position" generally take precedence over common interests.
In other words, the key determinants of successful cooperation may be whether the interaction resembles coadjustment or coercion; and the explanatory variables cited by the study may apply only to coadjustment.
To test this conditional version of Martin's thesis, the data analysis should have been disaggregated to test coercion and coadjustment scenarios separately.
[PM.sub.10] was also statistically significantly associated with chronic cough (OR =1.04; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.08), chronic phlegm (OR =1.07; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.11), and chronic cough or phlegm (OR = 1.05; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.08); coadjustment for [PM.sub.2.5] did not alter these effect estimates (Table S2).
In the N[O.sub.2] model, ORs were robust to coadjustment for [PM.sub.2.5] (Table S2).
These findings were robust to coadjustment for [PM.sub.2.5] in a two-pollutant model (Table S2).