Coadventurer

Co`ad`ven´tur`er


n.1.A fellow adventurer.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, if such relationship exists, it is of no consequence that the employee is designated as a partner, coadventurer, agent, independent contractor, or the like.
In not sharing information about the new lease with Meinhard, Chief Justice Cardozo indicates that Salmon's conduct "excluded his coadventurer from any chance to compete, from any chance to enjoy the opportunity for benefit that had come to him alone by virtue of his agency." (165) Consequently, Salmon was bound, at a minimum, to disclose this chance to Meinhard.
His lack of mala fides, however, was inconsequential, since "Salmon had put himself in a position in which thought of self was to be renounced, however hard the abnegation." (169) For this reason, Chief Justice Cardozo concludes that as a "managing coadventurer" who appropriated for himself the benefit of a new lease that was an extension of an existing lease, Salmon should have "fairly expect[ed] to be reproached with conduct that was underhand, or lacking, to say the least, in reasonable candor, if the partner were to surprise him in the act of signing the new instrument.
When Bear Grylls first announced that his next celebrity guest and coadventurer on his next Running Wild telecast would be no less than US President Barack Obama, we thought it was just wishful thinking on his part.
Well, when we finally caught Running Wild last month, it turned out that Grylls' proud announcement was no hollow boast-Obama did do the show with him-but, in deference to his coadventurer's age, stature and safety, the extreme program host didn't force the Prez to kill himself in an effort to triumph over and conquer nature at its steepest, rawest and harshest!
I did not wish to enter into an argument, so I joined my coadventurer in ordering a beer and a couple of south- east Asian dishes.
(127) In addition to plunging into the rocky shoals of Lloyd's, HIH became involved in unusual lines of insurance that basically made the firm a coadventurer with operating companies in highly risky fields of business.
In that case, there were two coadventurers, treated essentially as partners, who had leased and were operating a hotel.
Salmon (81) the New York Court of Appeals considered whether fiduciary duties were present among "coadventurers" in a business arrangement.
What better way to encourage subjects truly to be "coadventurers" in medical science than to give them a voice in determining the very terms of that adventure?