necrosis

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ne·cro·sis

 (nə-krō′sĭs, nĕ-)
n. pl. ne·cro·ses (-sēz′)
Death of cells through injury or disease, especially in a localized area of a tissue or organ.

[Late Latin necrōsis, a causing to die, killing, from Greek nekrōsis, death, from nekroun, to make dead, from nekros, corpse; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

ne·crot′ic (-krŏt′ĭk) adj.

necrosis

(nɛˈkrəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Pathology) the death of one or more cells in the body, usually within a localized area, as from an interruption of the blood supply to that part
2. (Botany) death of plant tissue due to disease, frost, etc
[C17: New Latin from Greek nekrōsis, from nekroun to kill, from nekros corpse]
necrotic adj

ne•cro•sis

(nəˈkroʊ sɪs)

n.
death of a circumscribed portion of animal or plant tissue.
[1655–65; < New Latin < Greek nékrōsis state of death = nekrō-, variant s. of nekroûn to kill, mortify]
ne•crot′ic (-ˈkrɒt ɪk) adj.
nec•ro•tize (ˈnɛk rəˌtaɪz) v.i., v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.

necrosis

the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Death, Decaying
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)
death - the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; "the animal died a painful death"
myonecrosis - localized death of muscle cell fibers
Translations
nekroosi
afstervingnecrose

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnécrose f

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnecrosi f inv

necrosis

n necrosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Occasionally, all patterns presented areas of coagulative necrosis. Due to the predominance of the first histological pattern, this meningioma was classified as papillary.
The characteristic histopathological findings include irregular para cortical areas of coagulative necrosis and karyorrhectic debri with large number of histiocytes at the margin of necrotic areas10.
Multifocal areas of coagulative necrosis were also associated with the loss of the normal structure of hepatic cords, with severe congestion of central and hepatic veins.
(24) Some tumors reveal features of dedifferentiation, such as prominent nucleoli, sarcomatoid change, or coagulative necrosis. In such tumors, searching of whole slides for classical low-grade morphology or intracytoplasmic inclusions can aid diagnosis.
Soft tissue leiomyomas are smooth muscle-derived benign tumours with minimal atypia and few mitoses but with no coagulative necrosis. They are seldom reported as occurring in the lower extremities (2).
This could be due to the misinterpretation of coagulative necrosis of glioblastoma multiforme as caseous necrosis of a tuberculoma.
The RFA process results in coagulative necrosis of the tissue immediately surrounding the probe.
It works by precipitating proteins and inducing coagulative necrosis of epidermis and/or papillary dermis followed by sloughing off of necrotic layers and re-epithelization, and promotes dermal collagen remodeling.4 Topical TCA is not significantly absorbed and, therefore, does not produce systemic complications.
Nodules may be seen in cortex and paracortex with coagulative necrosis and abundant karyorrhectic debris.
In cases of malignant biliary obstruction with stent placement, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) causes coagulative necrosis of tumor tissue to prevent tumor ingrowth and epithelial hyperplasia; this leads to improved biliary stent patency (1,2).
It is thought that, like uterine leiomyomas, mitotic activity probably does not signify malignancy in the absence of other adverse histological parameters, such as cytological atypia and coagulative necrosis [21].