coals to Newcastle


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coals to Newcastle

- Something brought or sent to a place where it is already plentiful; it is a reference to the English town of Newcastle upon Tyne, historically a major coal exporter.
See also related terms for sent.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
"Sure, sir," answered the barber, "you are too wise a man to carry a broken head thither; for that would be carrying coals to Newcastle."
However curious it may seem for an oil-ship to be borrowing oil on the whale-ground, and however much it may invertedly contradict the old proverb about carrying coals to Newcastle, yet sometimes such a thing really happens; and in the present case Captain Derick De Deer did indubitably conduct a lamp-feeder as Flask did declare.
And 'twould be like carrying coals to Newcastle, to drive those harts to Sherwood!
The report - Satellites to Sutherland: Not quite coals to Newcastle - raised concerns that far from bringing jobs and prosperity, the spaceport would obstruct the development of more appropriately-scaled businesses.
'We used the headline 'Coals to Newcastle', a very British joke as Newcastle was a famous region in the UK for producing coal.'
|Timothy Dexter: The man who sold coals to Newcastle Timothy Dexter was born in 1747 in Malden, Massachusetts into a family of colonial farmers who struggled to make ends meet.
COALS to Newcastle, sand to the Arabs, the English can sell anything to anybody - which is just as well as we're quitting Europe.
Deploying fuel cells plants across the Middle East may not be quite a case of "taking coals to Newcastle", but it does seem odd, given the region's abundant energy reserves.
SENDING coals to Newcastle or selling ice to the Eskimos are idioms that define pointlessness.
Coals to Newcastle? James Mills Pray JESUS said: "A SUS A nd when you stand praying, forgive...that your Father also may forgive you."
OK, that's a bit like taking coals to Newcastle, but it's the thought that counts.
Quartz found the vast majority of what Iran bought from the US in April was rice, lentils and chickpeas--though sending US chickpeas to the Middle East might smack of sending coals to Newcastle to some.