Labrador

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Lab·ra·dor

 (lăb′rə-dôr′)
The part of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, on the North American mainland. Controlled by the Hudson's Bay Company in the 1800s, the area was claimed by Quebec until 1927, when it was awarded to Newfoundland. Labrador is located on the northeast portion of the Labrador Peninsula, the eastern end of mainland Canada between Hudson Bay and the Atlantic Ocean, and forms the southern edge of the Labrador Sea, an arm of the northern Atlantic Ocean between eastern Canada and southwest Greenland.

Lab′ra·dor′e·an, Lab′ra·dor′i·an adj. & n.

Labrador

(ˈlæbrəˌdɔː)
n
1. (Placename) Also called: Labrador-Ungava a large peninsula of NE Canada, on the Atlantic, the Gulf of St Lawrence, Hudson Strait, and Hudson Bay: contains most of Quebec and the mainland part of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; geologically part of the Canadian Shield. Area: 1 619 000 sq km (625 000 sq miles)
2. (Placename) Also called: Coast of Labrador a region of NE Canada, on the Atlantic and consisting of the mainland part of Newfoundland and Labrador province
3. (Breeds) (often not capital) short for Labrador retriever

Lab•ra•dor

(ˈlæb rəˌdɔr)

n.
1. a peninsula in E Canada between Hudson Bay and the Atlantic, containing the provinces of Newfoundland and Quebec.
2. the E portion of this peninsula, constituting the mainland part of Newfoundland. 113,641 sq. mi. (294,330 sq. km).
3. (sometimes l.c.) Labrador retriever.
Lab•ra•dor•e•an, Lab•ra•dor•i•an (ˌlæb rəˈdɔr i ən) adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Labrador - the mainland part of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador in the eastern part of the large Labrador-Ungava Peninsula in northeastern CanadaLabrador - the mainland part of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador in the eastern part of the large Labrador-Ungava Peninsula in northeastern Canada
Newfoundland and Labrador - a Canadian province on the island of Newfoundland and on the mainland along the coast of the Labrador Sea; became Canada's 10th province in 1949
Labrador Peninsula, Labrador-Ungava Peninsula - a peninsular region of eastern Canada between Hudson Bay and the Labrador Sea; contains most of Quebec and the mainland part of Newfoundland and Labrador
Translations
labradoro retriveris

labrador

[ˈlæbrədɔː] Nlabrador m

labrador

[ˈlæbrədɔːr] labrador retriever, Labrador retriever nlabrador mlab technician ntechnicien(ne) m/f de laboratoire

Labrador

nLabradorhund m
References in classic literature ?
Yes, Vancouver's about as far as any vessel need want to go; and then I have caught seals off the coast of Labrador, and walked my way through the raspberry plains at the back of the White Mountains.
One complained of a bad cold in his head, upon which Jonah mixed him a pitch-like potion of gin and molasses, which he swore was a sovereign cure for all colds and catarrhs whatsoever, never mind of how long standing, or whether caught off the coast of Labrador, or on the weather side of an ice-island.
In any case, their voyage would probably end by their being thrown up on the rocky coast of Labrador.
33) It is not known how--or whether--this government work progressed alongside that of the Grenfell mission, but it is clear that the mission's long-standing commitment to travelling libraries continued for decades after this time, along with its own public libraries that it had also established long before as centres for local communities and for distribution of materials along the coast of Labrador.
Much of Steve's artistic inspiration is based on historic painting, including Hudson River Landscape painters Frederic Edwin Church, and William Bradford, who explored the coast of Labrador and Greenland.
These ducks breed in Arctic and sub-Arctic wetlands from the west coast of Alaska across most of northern Canada to the east coast of Labrador, according to the Sea Duck Joint Venture.
When the Voisey's Bay nickel deposit was discovered on the North Coast of Labrador 20 years ago this fall, it led to one of the largest staking rushes seen in North America.
They acquired the caps in trade with the French who exchanged them for meat and furs on the coast of Labrador [story of Captain Haan, published in 1720].
written by The Central Coast of Labrador Archaeology Partnership, illustrated by Cynthia Colosimo (Flanker Press)
In fact, despite Moravian efforts to prevent "their Inuit" from interactions with what they called the "heathern [sic]" Inuit who "lived to the southward," (25) the Inuit people moved back and forth along the coast of Labrador and there were extensive relations between the Moravian and non-Moravian Inuit.
The photos were tentatively identified and on a Canadian Coast Guard patrol along the coast of Labrador they were used to match the present day shoreline, and the remains of the station were found.
Mikak stepped onto history's stage at this time, when Britain wished to transplant Inuit away from the southernmost coast of Labrador, when tensions between the two peoples had reached a flash point, and, fortuitously, when the new governor considered it of utmost importance to protect the indigenous inhabitants under his jurisdiction from growing depredations (CO 194/27:78; CO 194/30:173; Whiteley, 1969, 1977).