heraldry

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Related to Coats of arm: Armorial bearings

her·ald·ry

 (hĕr′əl-drē)
n. pl. her·ald·ries
1.
a. The profession, study, or art of devising, granting, and blazoning arms, tracing genealogies, and determining and ruling on questions of rank or protocol, as exercised by an officer of arms.
b. A branch of knowledge dealing with the history and description in proper terms of armorial bearings and their accessories.
2. Armorial ensigns or similar insignia.
3. Pomp and ceremony, especially attended with armorial trappings; pageantry.

her′ald·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heraldry

(ˈhɛrəldrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Heraldry) the occupation or study concerned with the classification of armorial bearings, the allocation of rights to bear arms, the tracing of genealogies, etc
2. (Heraldry) the duties and pursuit of a herald
3. (Heraldry) armorial bearings, insignia, devices, etc
4. (Heraldry) heraldic symbols or symbolism
5. (Heraldry) the show and ceremony of heraldry
ˈheraldist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

her•ald•ry

(ˈhɛr əl dri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the study of armorial bearings.
2. the practice of blazoning and granting armorial bearings, tracing and recording genealogies, recording honors, and deciding precedence.
3. a heraldic device or devices.
4. ceremonial splendor.
[1350–1400]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

heraldry

1. the art of pictorial representation of genealogy, as through coats of arms, crests, etc.
2. the science of genealogy with special reference to aristocratic lineage. — herald, n. — heraldic, adj.
See also: Honors and Regalia
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heraldry - the study and classification of armorial bearings and the tracing of genealogiesheraldry - the study and classification of armorial bearings and the tracing of genealogies
blazon, blazonry, coat of arms, arms - the official symbols of a family, state, etc.
crest - (heraldry) in medieval times, an emblem used to decorate a helmet
device - an emblematic design (especially in heraldry); "he was recognized by the device on his shield"
fess, fesse - (heraldry) an ordinary consisting of a broad horizontal band across a shield
fleur-de-lys, fleur-de-lis - (heraldry) charge consisting of a conventionalized representation of an iris
ordinary - (heraldry) any of several conventional figures used on shields
inquiry, research, enquiry - a search for knowledge; "their pottery deserves more research than it has received"
ramp - be rampant; "the lion is rampant in this heraldic depiction"
armorial - of or relating to heraldry or heraldic arms; "armorial bearing"
2.heraldry - emblem indicating the right of a person to bear arms
annulet, roundel - (heraldry) a charge in the shape of a circle; "a hollow roundel"
armorial bearing, heraldic bearing, bearing, charge - heraldry consisting of a design or image depicted on a shield
blazon, blazonry, coat of arms, arms - the official symbols of a family, state, etc.
emblem - special design or visual object representing a quality, type, group, etc.
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

heraldry

noun
Quotations
"The science of fools with long memories" [J.R. Planché The Pursuivant of Arms]

Heraldry terms

achievement, annulet, argent, armes parlantes, armiger, armory, bandeau, bar, base, baton, bearing, bend, bend sinister, bezzant, bezant, or byzant, blazon, blazonry, bordure, cadency, canting arms, canton, chaplet, charge, checky, chevron, chief, cinquefoil, Clarenceux, coat armour, coat of arms, cockatrice, cognizance or cognisance, college of arms, compony or compone, coronet, couchant, crescent, crest, cross, crosslet, crown, dexter, difference, dimidiate, dormant, eagle, embattled, emblazon, ermine, escutcheon, falcon, fesse or fess, field, fillet, fleur-de-lis or fleur-de-lys, flory or fleury, fret, fur, fusil, garland, giron or gyron, gironny or gyronny, griffon, guardant or gardant, gules, hatchment, herald, heraldic or fetial, impale or empale, inescutcheon, issuant, king-of-arms, label, leopard, lion, lozenge, lozengy, Lyon King of Arms, mantling or lambrequin, mascle or voided lozenge, matriculation, moline, naissant, nombril, octofoil, officer of arms, or, ordinary, orle, pale, pall, paly, parted, party, passant, pean, pile, potent, proper, purpure, pursuivant, quarter, quartered, quartering, quarterly, rampant, rebus, regardant, roundel, sable, saltire, sejant or sejeant, scutcheon, semé (of) or semée (of), shield, sinister, spread eagle, statant, sun in splendour, supporter, torse, tressure, urdé or urdée, urinant, vair, vert, voided, volant, wreath, wyvern, yale
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
عِلْم شِعارات النَّبالَه
heraldika
heraldik
heraldika
címertan
skjaldarmerkjafræîi
heraldika
hanedan armacılığı

heraldry

[ˈherəldrɪ] Nheráldica f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

heraldry

[ˈhɛrəldri] n
(= study) → héraldique f
(= coat of arms) → blason m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

heraldry

n
(= science)Wappenkunde f, → Heraldik f
(= heraldic signs)Wappen pl
(= ceremonial)traditioneller höfischer Prunk
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

heraldry

[ˈhɛrldrɪ] naraldica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

herald

(ˈherəld) noun
formerly, a person who carries and reads important messages and notices (eg from a king). The king sent out heralds to announce the new law.
verb
to announce or be a sign of. A sharp wind often heralds a storm.
heˈraldic (-ˈrӕl-) adjective
of heraldry.
ˈheraldry noun
the study of coats of arms, crests etc and of the history of the families who have the right to use them.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Then we gazed round us at the high, thin window of old stained glass, the oak panelling, the stags' heads, the coats of arms upon the walls, all dim and sombre in the subdued light of the central lamp.
I could plainly discover whence one family derives a long chin; why a second has abounded with knaves for two generations, and fools for two more; why a third happened to be crack-brained, and a fourth to be sharpers; whence it came, what Polydore Virgil says of a certain great house, NEC VIR FORTIS, NEC FOEMINA CASTA; how cruelty, falsehood, and cowardice, grew to be characteristics by which certain families are distinguished as much as by their coats of arms; who first brought the pox into a noble house, which has lineally descended scrofulous tumours to their posterity.
Presently it brought me to stone uprights, with an unroofed lodge beside them, and coats of arms upon the top.
Let us behold, in poor Hepzibah, the immemorial, lady--two hundred years old, on this side of the water, and thrice as many on the other, --with her antique portraits, pedigrees, coats of arms, records and traditions, and her claim, as joint heiress, to that princely territory at the eastward, no longer a wilderness, but a populous fertility,--born, too, in Pyncheon Street, under the Pyncheon Elm, and in the Pyncheon House, where she has spent all her days, --reduced.
But the people, so often as it joined them, saw on their hindquarters the old feudal coats of arms, and deserted with loud and irreverent laughter.
For two and a half decades, the Lord President of the Council was Sir Henry Sidney KG and in 1574 he arranged for the coats of arms of 46 people associated with the castle and its history to be placed in the round chapel in the castle.
For example, provincial coats of arms are found in the Library of Parliament where, notably, some provinces are not represented, and the coats of arms of several provinces are outdated.
I went to the library of the university and looked for an illustrated catalogue of medieval coats of arms (Co A).
Noble families design coats of arms, using symbols and pictures to tell the history of their important families.
Deputy Prime Minister Vadimir Pesevski said the new coat of arms "has historical and lasting values and is not connected with any social order." BDI have also said the proposed idea was acceptable since, according to them, a lion is to be found in the coats of arms of many old and significant Albanian families as well in the coat of the arms of the city of Tirana.
He added: "In addition to their conjugal arms, their Royal Highnesses also retain their own coats of arms to represent themselves as individuals."