cocaine

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Related to Coccidioides immitis: blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, Cryptococcus neoformans

co·caine

 (kō-kān′, kō′kān′)
n.
A colorless or white crystalline alkaloid, C17H21NO4, extracted from coca leaves, sometimes used in medicine as a local anesthetic especially for the eyes, nose, or throat and widely used as an illicit drug for its euphoric and stimulating effects.

[French cocaïne, from coca, coca, from Spanish; see coca.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cocaine

(kəˈkeɪn) or

cocain

n
(Recreational Drugs) an addictive narcotic drug derived from coca leaves or synthesized, used medicinally as a topical anaesthetic. Formula: C17H21NO4
[C19: from coca + -ine1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

co•caine

(koʊˈkeɪn, ˈkoʊ keɪn)

n.
a bitter, white, crystalline alkaloid, C17H21NO4, obtained from coca leaves, used as a local anesthetic and also widely used as an illicit drug for its stimulant and euphoriant properties.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leavescocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leaves; used as a surface anesthetic or taken for pleasure; can become powerfully addictive
basuco - low-grade cocaine mixed with coca paste and cannabis
coca - dried leaves of the coca plant (and related plants that also contain cocaine); chewed by Andean people for their stimulating effect
nose candy, coke, snow, blow, C - street names for cocaine
crack cocaine, tornado, crack - a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snorted; highly addictive
hard drug - a narcotic that is considered relatively strong and likely to cause addiction
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
كوكائينكوكايينكُوكاييـن
kokain
kokain
kokaiin
kokaiini
kokain
kokain
kókaín
コカイン
코카인
kokainas
kokaīns
cocaină
kokaín
kokainкокаин
kokain
โคเคน
côcain

cocaine

[kəˈkeɪn]
A. Ncocaína f
B. CPD cocaine addict Ncocainómano/a m/f
cocaine addiction Nadicción f a la cocaína
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cocaine

[kəʊˈkeɪn]
ncocaïne f
modif
cocaine habit (= addiction) → dépendance f à la cocaïne
his £300 a day cocaine habit → sa dépendance à la cocaïne qui lui coûtait 300 livres par jour
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cocaine

nKokain nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cocaine

[kəˈkeɪn] ncocaina
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cocaine

(kəˈkein) noun
an addictive drug formerly used to deaden pain.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

cocaine

كُوكاييـن kokain kokain Kokain κοκαΐνη cocaína kokaiini cocaïne kokain cocaina コカイン 코카인 cocaïne kokain kokaina cocaína кокаин kokain โคเคน kokain côcain 可卡因
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

co·caine

n. cocaína, narcótico alcaloide adictivo complejo obtenido de las hojas de coca; slang nieve.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cocaine

n cocaína
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, there are usually enough clues that allow the cytopathologist to accurately distinguish between (or offer a differential diagnosis) the 4 most common of these fungi: Histoplasma capsulatum, Cryptococcus neoformans, Blastomyces dermatitidis, and Coccidioides immitis. As with all lower respiratory tract pathogens, integration of clinical, pathologic, radiographic, and individual patient risk factors is critical to establish a definitive diagnosis of disease.
Caption: FIGURE 1 Spore Formation in Coccidioides immitis
Coccidioidomycosis, also known as Valley fever, is a disease of growing public health concern and is caused by 2 closely related fungal species, Coccidioides immitis and C.
Effects of recombinant gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor on in-vitro interactions of human mononuclear phagocytes with Coccidioides immitis. Infect Immun 1991; 59: 4227-9.
Coccidioidomycosis, commonly referred to as valley fever, is caused by Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii, two nearly identical species of pathogenic fungi most commonly found in southern Arizona, central California, southern New Mexico, and West Texas.
The fungal conidia were round structures approximately 30-40 micrometers in diameter with 2 micrometers of thick pale basophilic cell walls and heterogeneous amorphous pale amphophilic central material, consistent with immature Coccidioides immitis spherules (Figure 1).
Coccidioides immitis antibody by immunodiffusion (ID) demonstrated a partial identity reaction indicating the presence of two different types of antibodies.
Isolation and characterization of the urease gene (URE) from the pathogenic fungus Coccidioides immitis. Gene.
Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis and posadasii, Sporothrix schenckii, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and lutzii, and Talaromyces marneffei replicate inside and outside of innate immune cells [27-31].
Five patients, each with different STAT1 GOF mutations (including T385M), were reported to have disseminated infections with intracellular dimorphic fungi such as Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum [17].
Among their topics are preparing for serious communicable diseases in the US: lessons from the ebola virus epidemic, measles in the US since the millennium: perils and progress in the post-elimination era, antimicrobial resistance expression by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: a major global public health problem in the 21st century, emerging fungal infections in the Pacific Northwest: the unrecognized burden and geographic range of Cryptococcus gattii and Coccidioides immitis, and the amphibian fungal disease chytridiomycosis as a key example of the global phenomenon of emerging wildlife infectious diseases.