cochineal

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coch·i·neal

 (kŏch′ə-nēl′, kŏch′ə-nēl′, kō′chə-, kō′chə-)
n.
1. A red colorant, whose primary constituent is carminic acid, that is made of the dried and pulverized bodies of female cochineal insects and is used to color food and cosmetics.
2. A vivid red.

[French cochenille, from Spanish cochinilla, cochineal insect, probably from Vulgar Latin *coccinella, from feminine diminutive of Latin coccinus, scarlet, from Greek kokkinos, from kokkos, seed, grain, dried female kermes insect (used in making scarlet dye), of unknown origin.]

coch′i·neal′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cochineal

(ˌkɒtʃɪˈniːl; ˈkɒtʃɪˌniːl)
n
1. (Animals) Also called: cochineal insect a Mexican homopterous insect, Dactylopius coccus, that feeds on cacti
2. (Cookery) a crimson substance obtained from the crushed bodies of these insects, used for colouring food and for dyeing
3. (Dyeing) a crimson substance obtained from the crushed bodies of these insects, used for colouring food and for dyeing
4. (Colours)
a. the colour of this dye
b. (as adjective): cochineal shoes.
[C16: from Old Spanish cochinilla, from Latin coccineus scarlet-coloured, from coccum cochineal kermes, from Greek kokkos kermes berry]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

coch•i•neal

(ˌkɒtʃ əˈnil, ˌkoʊ tʃə-, ˈkɒtʃ əˌnil, ˈkoʊ tʃə-)

n.
a red dye prepared from the dried bodies of the females of the cochineal insect, Dactylopius coccus, which lives on cactuses of warm regions.
[1575–85; < Middle French cochinille < Sp cochinilla the insect; of obscure orig.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cochineal - a red dyestuff consisting of dried bodies of female cochineal insects
dye, dyestuff - a usually soluble substance for staining or coloring e.g. fabrics or hair
2.cochineal - Mexican red scale insect that feeds on cacticochineal - Mexican red scale insect that feeds on cacti; the source of a red dye
scale insect - small homopterous insect that usually lives and feeds on plants and secretes a protective waxy covering
Dactylopius, genus Dactylopius - type genus of the Dactylopiidae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kilptäikošenill

cochineal

[ˈkɒtʃɪniːl] Ncochinilla f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cochineal

[ˌkɒtʃɪˈniːl] n (= food colouring) → colorant m rouge
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cochineal

n (= insect, colouring)Koschenille f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Cochineal extract is being used as colorant since centuries, it has wide applications as natural colorant into food, textile, medicine and personal care products.
The cochineal extract was used as the reducing agent for the biosynthesis of AgNPs, since green synthesis of the AgNPs has been an easy, affordable, inexpensive technique and is potentially not harmful to human health and the environment [9-14].
It takes about 2,500 bugs to produce one ounce of cochineal extract, used in ice creams, yogurts, candy, beverages and other foods.
When they discovered carmine, or cochineal extract, is a bug byproduct, consumers demanded an alternative.
British chef and food activist Jamie Oliver ignited a firestorm in January 2011 when he mentioned on the Late Show with David Letterman that castoreum, a substance used to augment some strawberry and vanilla flavorings, comes from what he described as "rendered beaver anal gland." (1) The next year, vegans were outraged to learn that Starbucks used cochineal extract, a color additive derived from insect shells, to dye their strawberry Frappuccino[R] drinks (2) (eventually, the company decided to transition to lycopene, a pigment found in tomatoes (3)).
The Seattle-based coffee giant also said that it will no longer use cochineal extract, which is processed from crushed beetles, to colour some of its red-tinted products.
The reddish cochineal extract and carmine came to the attention of the Center for Science in the Public Interest in 1998.
And though the dye is safe for most to consume, in a small number of people, cochineal extract can cause anaphylactic shock, or a severe allergic reaction that affects their ability to breathe.
The FDA recently published a final rule that amended its regulations to require the declaration by name of the color additives cochineal extract and carmine on the label of all food and cosmetic products in the U.S., effective January 2011.