cochlear implant

(redirected from Cochlear prosthesis)
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cochlear implant

n.
An electronic apparatus that allows people with severe hearing loss to recognize some sounds, especially speech sounds, and that consists chiefly of a microphone and receiver, a processor that converts speech into electronic signals, and an array of electrodes that transmit the signals to the cochlear nerve in the inner ear.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cochlear implant

(ˈkɒklɪə)
n
(Medicine) a device that stimulates the acoustic nerve in the inner ear in order to produce some form of hearing in people who are deaf from inner ear disease
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

coch′lear im′plant


n.
a surgically implanted hearing aid that converts sound reaching the cochlea into electrical impulses that are transmitted by wire to the auditory nerve.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Surgical and nonsurgical complications associated with cochlear prosthesis implantation.
Several experimental studies [14-16] revealed that an electric stimulation of the cochlea, delivered through cochlear prosthesis or transtympanic electrode, could alleviate tinnitus perception in a significant percentage of treated patients.
Implanted material tolerance studies for a multiple-channel cochlear prosthesis. Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 1984;411:71-81.
Speech perception using a two-formant 22-electrode cochlear prosthesis in quiet and in noise.
Diamond is also being developed as a layer to protect the silicon probe in the cochlear prosthesis, Aslam said.
against much opposition, to develop a practical cochlear prosthesis. At