Cockaigne


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Cock·aigne

 (kŏ-kān′)
n.
An imaginary land of easy and luxurious living.

[Middle English cokaigne, from Old French, from (pais de) cokaigne, (land of) plenty, from Middle Low German kōkenje, diminutive of kōke, cake.]

Cockaigne

(kɒˈkeɪn) or

Cockayne

n
(European Myth & Legend) medieval legend an imaginary land of luxury and idleness
[C14: from Old French cocaigne, from Middle Low German kōkenje small cake (of which the houses in the imaginary land are built); related to Spanish cucaña, Italian cuccagna]

Cock•aigne

or Cock•ayne

(kɒˈkeɪn)

n.
a fabled land of luxury and idleness.
[1250–1300; Middle English cokaygn(e) < Middle French (paide) cocaigne (land of) Cockaigne, idler's paradise]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cockaigne - (Middle Ages) an imaginary land of luxury and idleness
fictitious place, imaginary place, mythical place - a place that exists only in imagination; a place said to exist in fictional or religious writings
Dark Ages, Middle Ages - the period of history between classical antiquity and the Italian Renaissance
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
One is reminded of Cockaigne, that mythical land where gold-the yellow oil-flows freely, or of El Dorado, that lost city of gold visited by Candide.
One is reminded of Cockaigne, that mythical land where gold -- the yellow oil -- flows freely, or of El Dorado, that lost city of gold visited by Candide.
One is reminded of Cockaigne, that mythical land where gold - the yellow oil - flows freely, or of El Dorado, that lost city of gold visited by Candide.
The next day, she bandaged her feet, sent half the contents of her pack home with her husband, and went on to hike 20 miles to their final destination, Cockaigne Ski Resort.
The final number was Elgar's Cockaigne overture played using parts that had been donated in memory of the late Brian Tann by his widow Kathleen, both former members of the Phil.
Elgar's Overture: Cockaigne (In London Town) conveys characters and scenes through a careful choice of instruments - a soft horn line representing the quiet of a City church, a perky clarinet for the cheeky Cockney child and broad strings for the noble citizens and grandeur of the architecture.
The Elgar-devoted first half of the evening began with a Cockaigne overture which charmed and rose above its hackneyed swagger.
But in this world, simple walking is a Cockaigne miracle, like honest usury and pious bawdry.
13) Set in a sort of land of Cockaigne "vaguement medieval" (6), where even buildings have the shape of mouth-watering delicacies, Le Roi Bombance tells the story of the eponymous sovereign, ruler of the "Royaume des Bourdes" ("Citrulli" in the Italian version, where Bombance is named Baldoria (14)), following the death of his prime minister and royal cook Ripaille (Panciarguta), who committed suicide to expiate for the late delivery of a fish to the Royal table.
While Elgar's jaunty Cockaigne Overture was swallowed whole by the space, Vaughan Williams' Serenade to Music, played with luscious, concentrated sweetness, and with chorister-like clarity of tone from the sopranos, remained the most satisfying piece.
True, he had played these variations with the New York Philharmonic in the 1960s, along with the Cockaigne Overture, and he recorded several of the marches as fillers on the companion studio recording to this Royal Festival Hall performance.
The dream manifest in folk utopias, such as the medieval fantasy Land of Cockaigne, is one of a spontaneous deliverance from work by means of divine providence, or some other form of magic (Skidelsky and Skidelsky, 2012).