genetics

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ge·net·ics

 (jə-nĕt′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The branch of biology that deals with heredity, especially the mechanisms of hereditary transmission and the variation of inherited characteristics among similar or related organisms.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The genetic constitution of an individual, group, or class.

genetics

(dʒɪˈnɛtɪks)
n
1. (Biology) (functioning as singular) the branch of biology concerned with the study of heredity and variation in organisms
2. (Biology) the genetic features and constitution of a single organism, species, or group

ge•net•ics

(dʒəˈnɛt ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. the branch of biology that deals with the principles and mechanisms of heredity and with the genetic contribution to similarities and differences among related organisms.
2. the genetic properties or constitution of an organism or group.
[see genetic, -ics; term first proposed in this sense by British biologist William Bateson (1861–1926) in 1905]

ge·net·ics

(jə-nĕt′ĭks)
The scientific study of the principles of heredity and the variation of inherited traits among related organisms. Genetics is a branch of biology.

genetics

1. Biology. the science of heredity, studying resemblances and differences in related organisms and the mechanisms which explain these phenomena.
2. the genetic properties and phenomena of an organism. — geneticist, n. — genetic, adj.
See also: Heredity
the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in plants and animals. — geneticist, n.genetic, adj.
See also: Biology

genetics

Study of heredity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organismsgenetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
transformation - (genetics) modification of a cell or bacterium by the uptake and incorporation of exogenous DNA
hybridisation, hybridization, hybridizing, interbreeding, crossbreeding, crossing, cross - (genetics) the act of mixing different species or varieties of animals or plants and thus to produce hybrids
chromosome mapping, mapping - (genetics) the process of locating genes on a chromosome
carrier - (genetics) an organism that possesses a recessive gene whose effect is masked by a dominant allele; the associated trait is not apparent but can be passed on to offspring
amphidiploid - (genetics) an organism or cell having a diploid set of chromosomes from each parent
diploid - (genetics) an organism or cell having the normal amount of DNA per cell; i.e., two sets of chromosomes or twice the haploid number
haploid - (genetics) an organism or cell having only one complete set of chromosomes
heteroploid - (genetics) an organism or cell having a chromosome number that is not an even multiple of the haploid chromosome number for that species
polyploid - (genetics) an organism or cell having more than twice the haploid number of chromosomes
crossbreed, hybrid, cross - (genetics) an organism that is the offspring of genetically dissimilar parents or stock; especially offspring produced by breeding plants or animals of different varieties or breeds or species; "a mule is a cross between a horse and a donkey"
vector - (genetics) a virus or other agent that is used to deliver DNA to a cell
cosmid - (genetics) a large vector that is made from a bacteriophage and used to clone genes or gene fragments
character - (genetics) an attribute (structural or functional) that is determined by a gene or group of genes
unit character - (genetics) a character inherited on an all-or-none basis and dependent on the presence of a single gene
hereditary pattern, inheritance - (genetics) attributes acquired via biological heredity from the parents
heterosis, hybrid vigor - (genetics) the tendency of a crossbred organism to have qualities superior to those of either parent
gene linkage, linkage - (genetics) traits that tend to be inherited together as a consequence of an association between their genes; all of the genes of a given chromosome are linked (where one goes they all go)
fertilized ovum, zygote - (genetics) the diploid cell resulting from the union of a haploid spermatozoon and ovum (including the organism that develops from that cell)
heterozygote - (genetics) an organism having two different alleles of a particular gene and so giving rise to varying offspring
homozygote - (genetics) an organism having two identical alleles of a particular gene and so breeding true for the particular characteristic
cistron, gene, factor - (genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chain; it can include regions preceding and following the coding DNA as well as introns between the exons; it is considered a unit of heredity; "genes were formerly called factors"
allele, allelomorph - (genetics) either of a pair (or series) of alternative forms of a gene that can occupy the same locus on a particular chromosome and that control the same character; "some alleles are dominant over others"
haplotype - (genetics) a combination of alleles (for different genes) that are located closely together on the same chromosome and that tend to be inherited together
XX - (genetics) normal complement of sex chromosomes in a female
XXX - (genetics) abnormal complement of three X chromosomes in a female
XXY - (genetics) abnormal complement of sex hormones in a male resulting in Klinefelter's syndrome
XY - (genetics) normal complement of sex hormones in a male
XYY - (genetics) abnormal complement of sex hormones in a male who has two Y chromosomes
sex chromosome - (genetics) a chromosome that determines the sex of an individual; "mammals normally have two sex chromosomes"
Mendel's law - (genetics) one of two principles of heredity formulated by Gregor Mendel on the basis of his experiments with plants; the principles were limited and modified by subsequent genetic research
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
cytogenetics - the branch of biology that studies the cellular aspects of heredity (especially the chromosomes)
genomics - the branch of genetics that studies organisms in terms of their genomes (their full DNA sequences)
proteomics - the branch of genetics that studies the full set of proteins encoded by a genome
molecular genetics - the branch of genetics concerned with the structure and activity of genetic material at the molecular level
pharmacogenetics - the branch of genetics that studies the genetically determined variations in responses to drugs in humans or laboratory organisms
recombination - (genetics) a combining of genes or characters different from what they were in the parents
chromosomal mutation, genetic mutation, mutation - (genetics) any event that changes genetic structure; any alteration in the inherited nucleic acid sequence of the genotype of an organism
Translations
عِلْمُ الوِرَاثَةعِلم الوراثَه
genetika
genetik
perinnöllisyystiede
genetika
genetika
erfîafræîi
遺伝学遺伝的特性
유전학
genetika
genetik
พันธุศาสตร์
di truyền học

genetics

[dʒɪˈnetɪks] NSINGgenética f

genetics

[dʒɪˈnɛtɪks] ngénétique f

genetics

n singVererbungslehre f, → Genetik f

genetics

[dʒɪˈnɛtɪks] nsggenetica

gene

(dʒiːn) noun
any of the basic elements of heredity, passed from parents to their offspring. If the children are red-haired, one of their parents must have a gene for red hair.
genetic (dʒəˈnetik) adjective
of genes or genetics. a genetic abnormality.
genetic engineering noun
the science of changing the genetic features of animals and plants.
genetics (dʒəˈnetiks) noun singular
the science of heredity.

genetics

عِلْمُ الوِرَاثَة genetika genetik Genetik γενετική genética perinnöllisyystiede génétique genetika genetica 遺伝学 유전학 erfelijkheidsleer genetikk genetyka genética генетика genetik พันธุศาสตร์ genetik bilimi di truyền học 遗传学

ge·net·ics

n. genética, rama de la biología que estudia la herencia y las leyes que la gobiernan;
medical ______ médica.

genetics

n genética
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