cryptography

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cryp·tog·ra·phy

 (krĭp-tŏg′rə-fē)
n.
1. Computers Any of various mathematical techniques for encrypting and decrypting data in order to keep it private when transmitted or stored electronically.
2. The process or skill of communicating in or deciphering secret writings or ciphers.
3. Secret writing.

cryp′to·graph′ic (-tə-grăf′ĭk) adj.
cryp′to·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cryptography

(krɪpˈtɒɡrəfɪ) or

cryptology

n
(Communications & Information) the science or study of analysing and deciphering codes, ciphers, etc; cryptanalysis
crypˈtographer, crypˈtographist, crypˈtologist n
cryptographic, ˌcryptoˈgraphical, cryptologic, ˌcryptoˈlogical adj
ˌcryptoˈgraphically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cryp•tog•ra•phy

(krɪpˈtɒg rə fi)

n.
the study or the application of the techniques of secret writing, esp. code and cipher systems. Compare cryptanalysis.
[1635–45]
cryp•tog′ra•pher, cryp•tog′ra•phist, n.
cryp`to•graph′ic (-təˈgræf ɪk) cryp`to•graph′i•cal, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cryptography

1. the science or study of secret writing, especially code and cipher systems.
2. the procedures and methods of making and using secret languages, as codes or ciphers. — cryptographer, cryptographist, n.cryptographic, cryptographical, cryptographal, adj.
See also: Writing
1. the science or study of secret writing, especially code and cipher systems.
2. the procedures and methods of making and using secret languages, as codes or ciphers. — cryptographer, cryptographist, n. — cryptographic, cryptographical, cryptographal, adj.
See also: Language
1. the science or study of secret writing, especially codes and ciphers.
2. the procedures and methods of making and using codes and ciphers. — cryptographer, cryptographist, n. — cryptographic, adj.
See also: Code
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cryptography - the science of analyzing and deciphering codes and ciphers and cryptograms
science, scientific discipline - a particular branch of scientific knowledge; "the science of genetics"
2.cryptography - act of writing in code or cipher
committal to writing, writing - the activity of putting something in written form; "she did the thinking while he did the writing"
encoding, encryption - the activity of converting data or information into code
recoding - converting from one code to another
decipherment, decoding, decryption - the activity of making clear or converting from code into plain text; "a secret key or password is required for decryption"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cryptography

[krɪpˈtɒgrəfɪ] Ncriptografía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cryptography

nKryptografie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
It will take visitors on a journey, starting with the earliest examples of codes and ciphers, going on to look at methods of secret communication used during war times then exploring how modern technology uses code to allow us to communicate safely today.
Most books about cryptography are organized historically, or around how codes and ciphers have been used, such as in government and military intelligence or bank transactions.Joshua Holden instead shows how mathematical principles underpin the ways that different codes and ciphers operate.
Readers learn more about how codes and ciphers work along with the sleuths, who can't help but wonder if the cipher is manipulating them.
During its first year, the Central Bureau struggled to unravel Japanese military codes and ciphers. Yet, Sinkov and his analysts gained valuable experience and expertise and eventually became a first-rate cryptologic organization.
Readers will be intrigued by the examples of codes and ciphers used by ancient and modern armies, organizations with secret rituals, mysterious designs etched into the ground, symbols of ancient royalty, and stone buildings and statues whose purpose are no longer known.