codicology

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codicology

(ˌkəʊdɪˈkɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Library Science & Bibliography) the study of manuscripts
[C20: via French from Latin codic-, codex + -logy]
codicological adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

codicology

the study of early manuscripts. — codicologist, n. — codicologic, codicological, adj.
See also: Manuscripts
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mediaeval Manichaean Book Art: A Codicological Study of Iranian and Turkic Illuminated Book Fragments from 8th-11th Century East Central Asia (reprint, 2005)
The next essay by Thomas Schmidt consolidates, confirms, and completes previous codicological studies and scribal analyses of this manuscript.
Previous scholarship on Islamic bookbinding has addressed the descriptions of materials and techniques provided in each of the few known historical treatises and technical manuals in Arabic and Persian (Bosch 1961; Gacek 1990, 1991, and 1997; Porter 1992), elaborated classification schemes based on cover elements such as a flap or stamped or tooled ornaments (Weisweiler 1962; Deroche 1985), highlighted evidence for particular structural features and techniques as observed on a small scale (Baydar 2002; Rose 2010; Benson 2015), or relied on written and physical evidence to explore the codicological potential of structural features such as repairs (Kropf 2013).
Honkapohja, Alpo, Alchemy, Medicine, and Commercial Book Production: A Codicological and Linguistic Study of the Voigts-Sloane Manuscript Group (Texts and Transitions, 9), Turnhout, Brepols, 2017; hardback; pp.
Investigations into fading Latin literacy, an increasing demand for vernacular literature, the adaptation of the AW for late medieval readers, and changes in readership over the history of the A Wcarried out by scholars who focus on late medieval England readership, such as Bella Millett, Catherine Innes-Parker, Christina von Nolcken, and Nicholas Watson, can be deepened and fruitfully complicated by considering not just codicological questions, but by asking such questions of the earliest manuscripts in the tradition.
Palmer occasionally plays on the boundary of bibliographic excess, indulging in overwhelming lists, slightly wishful quantification, and overzealous codicological description.
It combines philological and codicological acumen with theoretical flair as it advocates for more scholarly attention to the complex, self-interrogating, and unsettling ways that the Devisement invites audiences to relate to the diversities of the world.
The introductory material on each manuscript source begins with a summary (set out as in the Census-Catalogue) of the contents (by genre) and of the composers represented, followed by codicological information including data regarding copyists, decoration, watermarks (these are not reproduced), dating, and references to the book concerned in inventories.
The first chapter analyzes the manuscript from a codicological and palaeographic perspective.
In the present publication we are given a facsimile reproduction of the original nipah-palm manuscript and a parallel diplomatic edition accompanied by paleographic and codicological remarks.