coefficient of friction

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coefficient of friction

n. pl. coefficients of friction
The ratio of the force of friction between an object and a surface to the frictional force resisting the motion of the object.

coefficient of friction

n
(General Engineering) mechanical engineering the force required to move two sliding surfaces over each other, divided by the force holding them together. It is reduced once the motion has started
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Noun1.coefficient of friction - the ratio of the weight of an object being moved along a surface and the force that maintains contact between the object and the surface
coefficient - a constant number that serves as a measure of some property or characteristic
References in periodicals archive ?
In the current study, the coefficient of static friction was measured by quantifying the maximum achievable angle, (16) and the coefficients of friction for the running shoes were within the range of data reported in previous studies.
The parameters [12] included a frequency of f = 3000 Hz, a normal pressure of [p.sub.n] = 0.022 N/[mm.sup.2], an area of A = 1200 [mm.sup.2], a coefficient of contact rigidity in tangential direction of [[sigma].sup.1] = 67.29 N/[micro]m, a coefficient of contact damping in tangential direction of [[sigma].sup.2] = 1 x [10.sup.-3] N/([micro]m/s), a coefficient of static friction of = 0.106, and a coefficient of static friction of [[micro].sub.S] = 0.193.
showed that junction disclosure at friction coefficient (coefficient of static friction in "steel--brass" pair) would occur when the tilt angle of mounting plate [gamma] < 14,4[degrees].
The coefficient of static friction of the water hyacinth briquette ranged from 0.35 ([B.sub.5]) to 0.47 ([B.sub.1]) for galvanized steel as shown in Table 3.
Coefficient of static friction is the ratio of force required to start sliding a given sample over a particular surface to the normal force, which is the weight of the object [7].
For contacting surfaces at rest, the initial coefficient of friction was defined as the coefficient of static friction ([[mu].sub.s]), whereas, for surfaces in relative motion, it was denoted as the coefficient of dynamic friction ([[mu].sub.d).
The force needed to start an object sliding traditionally depends on two things: its weight (and any other downward forces) and a number called the coefficient of static friction. This number is thought to be dictated by the roughness of an object and the surface beneath, as well as the material each is made off rubber's coefficient is larger than Teflon's on the same surface.

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