Coeur


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Coeur

(kɜː; French kœr)
n
(Biography) Jacques. ?1395–1456, French merchant; councillor and court banker to Charles VII of France
References in classic literature ?
And clear across to the Atlantic, the Junta in touch with them all and all of them needing guns, mere adventurers, soldiers of fortune, bandits, disgruntled American union men, socialists, anarchists, rough-necks, Mexican exiles, peons escaped from bondage, whipped miners from the bull-pens of Coeur d'Alene and Colorado who desired only the more vindictively to fight--all the flotsam and jetsam of wild spirits from the madly complicated modern world.
"Mr Western," answered the lady, "you may say what you please, je vous mesprise de tout mon coeur. I shall not therefore be angry.
Je n'ai pas le coeur assez large to love a whole asylum of horrid little girls.
Le coeur d'un beau jeune homme est souvent difforme.
I am only sorry that my new friends--my French family--do not live in the old city--au coeur du vieux Paris, as they say here.
Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connait pas.
The plain of Esdraelon--"the battle-field of the nations"--only sets one to dreaming of Joshua, and Benhadad, and Saul, and Gideon; Tamerlane, Tancred, Coeur de Lion, and Saladin; the warrior Kings of Persia, Egypt's heroes, and Napoleon--for they all fought here.
Finally, the latest episode in Poland still fresh in the captain's memory, and which he narrated with rapid gestures and glowing face, was of how he had saved the life of a Pole (in general, the saving of life continually occurred in the captain's stories) and the Pole had entrusted to him his enchanting wife (parisienne de coeur) while himself entering the French service.
To those great geniuses now in petticoats, who shall write novels for the beloved reader's children, these men and things will be as much legend and history as Nineveh, or Coeur de Lion, or Jack Sheppard.
Like the sword of Coeur De Lion, which always blazed in the front and thickest of the battle, Sam's palm-leaf was to be seen everywhere when there was the least danger that a horse could be caught; there he would bear down full tilt, shouting, "Now for it!
"Votre devouee eleve, qui vous aime de tout son coeur."
"Mon fils, as-tu du coeur?" she cried when she saw me, and then giggled.