cognate

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cog·nate

 (kŏg′nāt′)
adj.
1. Related by blood; having a common ancestor.
2. Related in origin, as certain words in genetically related languages descended from the same ancestral root; for example, English name and Latin nōmen from Indo-European *nō̆-men-.
3. Related or analogous in nature, character, or function.
n.
1. One related by blood or origin with another, especially a person sharing an ancestor with another.
2. A word related to one in another language.
3. A sequence of university courses taken as an adjunct to a graduate degree program: earned an MA in linguistics with a cognate in computer science.

[Latin cognātus : co-, co- + gnātus, born, past participle of nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·na′tion n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cognate

(ˈkɒɡneɪt)
adj
1. akin; related: cognate languages.
2. (Law) related by blood or descended from a common maternal ancestor. Compare agnate
3. (Grammar) cognate object grammar a noun functioning as the object of a verb to which it is etymologically related, as in think a thought or sing a song
n
something that is cognate with something else
[C17: from Latin cognātus, from co- same + gnātus born, variant of nātus, past participle of nāscī to be born]
ˈcognately adv
ˈcognateness n
cogˈnation n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cog•nate

(ˈkɒg neɪt)

adj.
1. related by birth; of the same parentage or descent.
2. descended from the same language or form: such cognate languages as French and Spanish.
3. allied or similar in nature or quality.
n.
4. a person or thing cognate with another.
5. a cognate word: The English word cold is a cognate of German kalt.
[1635–45; < Latin cognātus=co- co- + -gnātus, past participle of (g)nāscī to be born]
cog′nate•ly, adv.
cog′nate•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cognate

a relation through descent on the female side. Cf. agnate. — cognate, — cognatic, adj.
See also: Relationship
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognate - one related by blood or origin; especially on sharing an ancestor with another
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
2.cognate - a word is cognate with another if both derive from the same word in an ancestral language
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Adj.1.cognate - related in nature; "connate qualities"
related, related to - being connected either logically or causally or by shared characteristics ; "painting and the related arts"; "school-related activities"; "related to micelle formation is the...ability of detergent actives to congregate at oil-water interfaces"
2.cognate - having the same ancestral language; "cognate languages"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
related, related to - being connected either logically or causally or by shared characteristics ; "painting and the related arts"; "school-related activities"; "related to micelle formation is the...ability of detergent actives to congregate at oil-water interfaces"
3.cognate - related by bloodcognate - related by blood      
related - connected by kinship, common origin, or marriage
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cognate

adjective related, similar, allied, associated, connected, alike, affiliated, akin, analogous, kindred Apocalypticism and millennialism are cognate theological terms.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

cognate

adjective
Connected by or as if by kinship or common origin:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

cognate

[ˈkɒgneɪt]
A. ADJcognado (with con) → afín
B. Ncognado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cognate

adjverwandt; (Ling) → urverwandt
n (Ling) → urverwandtes Wort, urverwandte Sprache; “night” is a cognate of “Nacht”night“ ist mit „Nachtverwandt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cognate

n. cognado, palabra que proviene del mismo tronco o raíz;
a. cognado-a, de la misma naturaleza o calidad.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
And the habit which is concerned with geometry and the cognate sciences I suppose that you would term understanding and not reason, as being intermediate between opinion and reason.
Whether that Artificer of things, The origin of a better world, made him from the divine seed; Or the earth, being recent and lately sundered from the high Ether, retained some seeds of cognate heaven."
The second most productive verb-noun combinations that seem to enter the COC in present-day British English, with an average normalised frequency of 81.89, are the ones comprising the cognates listed below:
The first 15 pages yielded many cognates, strong to weak, but most share a common prefix, either ab- (from) or ad- (to).
Several researchers have commented on the effective use of cognates (Garcia & Nagy, 1993; Nagy, Garcia, Durgunolgu, & Hancin-Bhatt, 1993).
One hundred and fifty apparent cognates in Turkish and Urdu languages will be analyzed in order to confirm their origin as well as lexical similarity through their distance.
The Saami reflexes (SaaN jdpmit, etc.) mean'die', whereas the Finnic cognates are derived adjectives such as Fi jamea and jamakka with meanings such as 'stiff' and 'sturdy'.
Cognates are words that are semantically and phonologically similar in two languages, (Holmes & Guerra Ramos, 1995).
One year before that Alo Raun had published a small reference book, that in a very concise style gives in one line the origin of the word and a few cognates (Raun 1982).
To show this, he examines the words for household and cognates in their concrete and symbolic contexts, assuming little or no continuity between cultures or time periods.
Using an algorithm known as the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler, the program sorted through sets of cognates - words in different languages that share a common sound, history and origin - to calculate the odds of which set is derived from which proto-language.
Some related issues are the existence of one or more lexica (one for each language of the speaker), the language-(non)selectiveness of lexical access (1), the processing and storage of cognates, etc.