cognitive dissonance

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cognitive dissonance

n. Psychology
The psychological tension that occurs when one holds mutually exclusive beliefs or attitudes and that often motivates people to modify their thoughts or behaviors in order to reduce the tension.

cognitive dissonance

n
(Psychology) psychol an uncomfortable mental state resulting from conflicting cognitions; usually resolved by changing some of the cognitions

cog′nitive dis′sonance


n.
anxiety that results from simultaneously holding contradictory or incompatible attitudes, beliefs, or the like, as when one likes a person but disapproves of one of his or her habits.
Translations
kognitive Dissonanz
References in periodicals archive ?
Incorporating new advances and recent research in this edition, chapters discuss cognitive dissonance theory; work that uses the original version of dissonance theory, including improving the original version, radical dissonance theory, an action-based model of dissonance theory, cognitive consistency, and ambivalence and discrepancy detection; revisions of cognitive dissonance theory that use the self as a factor in dissonance processes, with discussion of hypocrisy and self-affirmation theory; and mathematical models of dissonance processes, including a connectionist model, the neural basis of cognitive dissonance, and measuring dissonance as psychological discomfort.
This study utilized cognitive dissonance theory proposed by Festinger (1957) to conceptually explain and interpret the findings of the study.
The second section covers 27 theories in 27 chapters, which are divided into six broad classifications: the self and messages (e.g., cognitive dissonance theory and symbolic interaction theory); relationship development (e.g., social exchange theory and relational dialectics theory); groups, teams, and organizations (e.g., groupthink and organizational culture theory); the public (e.g., the rhetoric and the narrative paradigm); the media (e.g., uses and gratifications theory and agenda setting theory); and culture and diversity (e.g., muted group theory and feminist standpoint theory).
The intervention employs the basic psychological principles of cognitive dissonance theory: Do the opposite of a negative attitude.
The study is based on cognitive dissonance theory and students' evaluation of teachers and courses.
To the best of our knowledge, no research has used cognitive dissonance theory to understand how teachers' heterogeneous beliefs--beliefs of culturally proficient teaching and deficit beliefs about academic achievement of diverse students--are parsed in accordance with practices.
According to cognitive dissonance theory, humans like to be consistent in their beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors and, when they are not, that difference causes discomfort.
We probably all remember cognitive dissonance theory from high school or college psychology class.
The aim of our research is to explore the link between Action Identification Theory and Cognitive Dissonance Theory, focusing on the impact of identification of a dissonant behavior on the processes of dissonance reduction.
In the present research we have extended the cognitive dissonance theory, and addressed the influence of social comparisons on the intentions of cognitively dissonant consumers to disseminate negative truthful WOM information and untruthful WOM information in online communities.
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