cognitive dissonance

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cognitive dissonance

n. Psychology
The psychological tension that occurs when one holds mutually exclusive beliefs or attitudes and that often motivates people to modify their thoughts or behaviors in order to reduce the tension.

cognitive dissonance

n
(Psychology) psychol an uncomfortable mental state resulting from conflicting cognitions; usually resolved by changing some of the cognitions

cog′nitive dis′sonance


n.
anxiety that results from simultaneously holding contradictory or incompatible attitudes, beliefs, or the like, as when one likes a person but disapproves of one of his or her habits.
Translations
kognitive Dissonanz
References in periodicals archive ?
Cognitive dissonance theory was proposed by Festinger (1957) and has made a significant mark on the field of social psychology (Metin & Camgoz, 2011).
The study is based on cognitive dissonance theory and students' evaluation of teachers and courses.
These conflicting beliefs can be explained by cognitive dissonance theory.
Although schema theory describes how an individual processes information attempting to make sense of it, the theory does not describe how a decision is made (Axelrod, 1974); however, cognitive dissonance theory has provided an overview of the thought process a person undertakes when he or she thinks about a decision internally (Festinger, 1962).
According to cognitive dissonance theory, humans like to be consistent in their beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors and, when they are not, that difference causes discomfort.
We probably all remember cognitive dissonance theory from high school or college psychology class.
It address the concept of persuasion, attitude assessment and change, the relationship of attitudes and behavior, and the assessment of persuasive effects; theoretical perspectives like functional approaches to attitude, belief-based models of attitude, cognitive dissonance theory, and the elaboration likelihood model; and research on persuasive effects and communicator, message, and receiver factors.
The aim of our research is to explore the link between Action Identification Theory and Cognitive Dissonance Theory, focusing on the impact of identification of a dissonant behavior on the processes of dissonance reduction.
In the present research we have extended the cognitive dissonance theory, and addressed the influence of social comparisons on the intentions of cognitively dissonant consumers to disseminate negative truthful WOM information and untruthful WOM information in online communities.
The cognitive dissonance theory assumes that the dissonance occurs between the individual ideas and behaviors when he recognizes a new cognition that is not consonant with his exisiting beliefs and opinions.
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