cognition

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cog·ni·tion

 (kŏg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The mental process of knowing, including aspects such as awareness, perception, reasoning, and judgment.
2. That which comes to be known, as through perception, reasoning, or intuition; knowledge.

[Middle English cognicioun, from Latin cognitiō, cognitiōn-, from cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn : co-, intensive pref.; see co- + gnōscere, to know; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·ni′tion·al adj.

cognition

(kɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
1. (Psychology) the mental act or process by which knowledge is acquired, including perception, intuition, and reasoning
2. the knowledge that results from such an act or process
[C15: from Latin cognitiō, from cognōscere from co- (intensive) + nōscere to learn; see know]
cogˈnitional adj

cog•ni•tion

(kɒgˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act or process of knowing; perception.
2. something known or perceived.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin cognitiō <cogni-, variant s. of cognōscere to get to know (co- co- + (g)nōscere to get to know) + -tiō -tion]
cog•ni′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoningcognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
mind, psyche, nous, brain, head - that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head"
place - an abstract mental location; "he has a special place in my thoughts"; "a place in my heart"; "a political system with no place for the less prominent groups"
general knowledge, public knowledge - knowledge that is available to anyone
episteme - the body of ideas that determine the knowledge that is intellectually certain at any particular time
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
inability - lack of ability (especially mental ability) to do something
lexis - all of the words in a language; all word forms having meaning or grammatical function
lexicon, mental lexicon, vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
cognitive factor - something immaterial (as a circumstance or influence) that contributes to producing a result
equivalent - a person or thing equal to another in value or measure or force or effect or significance etc; "send two dollars or the equivalent in stamps"
cognitive operation, cognitive process, mental process, process, operation - (psychology) the performance of some composite cognitive activity; an operation that affects mental contents; "the process of thinking"; "the cognitive operation of remembering"
unconscious process, process - a mental process that you are not directly aware of; "the process of denial"
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
structure - the complex composition of knowledge as elements and their combinations; "his lectures have no structure"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
history - all that is remembered of the past as preserved in writing; a body of knowledge; "the dawn of recorded history"; "from the beginning of history"
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"

cognition

noun (Formal) perception, reasoning, understanding, intelligence, awareness, insight, comprehension, apprehension, discernment processes of perception and cognition
Translations

cognition

[kɒgˈnɪʃən] Ncognición f

cognition

nErkenntnis f; (visual) → Wahrnehmung f

cognition

[ˌkɒgˈnɪʃn] n (frm) → apprendimento

cog·ni·tion

n. cognición, conocimiento, acción y efecto de conocer.
References in periodicals archive ?
They address the role of biology in psychological development, cognitive development and constructivist and sociocultural approaches to childrenAEs thinking, the development of communication and language, the development of higher-order cognitive processes, social cognitive development, and moral development.
They can learn and construct knowledge from structured and unstructured sources of information; capture the expertise of top performers and accelerate the development of expertise in others; enhance the cognitive processes of professionals to help improve decision making; and elevate the quality and consistency of decision making across an organization.
Its purposes are to find out: 1) cognitive processes they use in their EFL writings; and, 2) who uses those cognitive processes more completely.
Early writing research was conducted with theoretical underpinnings of cognitive processes without the inclusion of society and culture (Prior, 2006).
Based on findings of cognitive science following the original publication, a later revision of the taxonomy changes the nomenclature and order of the cognitive processes in the original version.
Australian scientists at the Swinburne University of Technology have been investigating natural pharmacological remedies that may be effective in aiding the preservation of cognitive processes like memory, speech and reasoning.
SPIRIT aims to study the cognitive processes and neural mechanisms underpinning the influence of self-transcendence and spirituality on the embodied instantiations of social perception and empathy.
Washington, July 15 ( ANI ): A new study has revealed that Older people are nearly twice as likely as their younger counterparts to have their memory and cognitive processes impaired by environmental distractions (such as irrelevant speech or written words presented along with target stimuli).
This edition has been revised and updated to cover all areas of cognition, including perception, attention, memory, thinking, and language, as well as a new chapter on the effects of emotion on cognitive processes, and more on neuropsychological disorders and brain imaging.
As more and more simulations are being implemented for very specific purposes, classification systems for simulation are scarce and different theoretical concepts provide diverse explanations of cognitive processes regarding simulation.
CTA is aimed at helping researchers explore cognitive processes in depth and apply this knowledge to the design of tools, technologies, work systems, and training (Hoffman & Militello, 2009).
Linguo-cognitive model of the concept as the flexible regulative rationality reveals the activity of the cognitive processes and the mentality of the epistemological-ontic subject, its leading constructive role in the formation of the language, and world pictures of conceptual post-non-classic type.

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