cognition

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Related to Cognitive processing: Cognitive Processing Therapy

cog·ni·tion

 (kŏg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The mental process of knowing, including aspects such as awareness, perception, reasoning, and judgment.
2. That which comes to be known, as through perception, reasoning, or intuition; knowledge.

[Middle English cognicioun, from Latin cognitiō, cognitiōn-, from cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn : co-, intensive pref.; see co- + gnōscere, to know; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·ni′tion·al adj.

cognition

(kɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
1. (Psychology) the mental act or process by which knowledge is acquired, including perception, intuition, and reasoning
2. the knowledge that results from such an act or process
[C15: from Latin cognitiō, from cognōscere from co- (intensive) + nōscere to learn; see know]
cogˈnitional adj

cog•ni•tion

(kɒgˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act or process of knowing; perception.
2. something known or perceived.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin cognitiō <cogni-, variant s. of cognōscere to get to know (co- co- + (g)nōscere to get to know) + -tiō -tion]
cog•ni′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoningcognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
mind, psyche, nous, brain, head - that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head"
place - an abstract mental location; "he has a special place in my thoughts"; "a place in my heart"; "a political system with no place for the less prominent groups"
general knowledge, public knowledge - knowledge that is available to anyone
episteme - the body of ideas that determine the knowledge that is intellectually certain at any particular time
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
inability - lack of ability (especially mental ability) to do something
lexis - all of the words in a language; all word forms having meaning or grammatical function
lexicon, mental lexicon, vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
cognitive factor - something immaterial (as a circumstance or influence) that contributes to producing a result
equivalent - a person or thing equal to another in value or measure or force or effect or significance etc; "send two dollars or the equivalent in stamps"
cognitive operation, cognitive process, mental process, process, operation - (psychology) the performance of some composite cognitive activity; an operation that affects mental contents; "the process of thinking"; "the cognitive operation of remembering"
unconscious process, process - a mental process that you are not directly aware of; "the process of denial"
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
structure - the complex composition of knowledge as elements and their combinations; "his lectures have no structure"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
history - all that is remembered of the past as preserved in writing; a body of knowledge; "the dawn of recorded history"; "from the beginning of history"
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"

cognition

noun (Formal) perception, reasoning, understanding, intelligence, awareness, insight, comprehension, apprehension, discernment processes of perception and cognition
Translations

cognition

[kɒgˈnɪʃən] Ncognición f

cognition

nErkenntnis f; (visual) → Wahrnehmung f

cognition

[ˌkɒgˈnɪʃn] n (frm) → apprendimento

cog·ni·tion

n. cognición, conocimiento, acción y efecto de conocer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, teachers must learn to blend the old and the new to create learning events that are technology based but also encourage cognitive processing in ways that are engaging enough for learners to experience the pleasure of 'flow' in academic events.
According to researchers, This promotes deeper cognitive processing. Sans Forgetica is a backward slanted font and has breaks in the text so that the brain is challenged to connect the gaps, hence retaining more of what is read.
Hernandez, a middle school teacher, proposes that active engagement is when students do something that facilitates cognitive processing of course content and that teachers need to activate students' executive function and involve them in tasks that align their physical actions with cognitive processing of course content.
The Study: Neuropsychological testing to evaluate the children's attention span, impulsivity, short-term memory, cognitive processing speed, and verbal learning was administered twice to 128 children 8 to 10 years old.
After one has a solid understanding, one should create questions that might fall into the different knowledge and cognitive processing dimensions, based on one's and/or a course's goals and objectives.
Bloom's taxonomy contains six categories of cognitive skills ranging from lower-order skills that require less cognitive processing to higher-order skills that require deeper learning and a greater degree of cognitive processing (Figure 1).
With advanced age comes the possibility of slower cognitive processing that eventually might even lead to disorders ike dementia and Parkinson's disease.
According to a study from psychologists at Rice University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, older people are twice as much slowing in cognitive processing in the presence of distracting information in the environment.
Chapter 2, entitled 'Simulation and Cognition', presents an overview of cognitive theories which use simulation as a metaphor for cognitive processing. The theory of mental models is used for explaining the complex functions of information processing and its internal and external representations.
The topics include dual modes in social cognition, representation in memory, accuracy and efficiency is social inference, the cognitive processing of attitudes, and from social cognition to affect and back.
Drawing on Lavelle's work with the aural-visual contrast (1942), Ong basically aligns philosophic thought and scientific thought with visual cognitive processing. In short, formalized visual cognitive processing is the form and condition of Western philosophic and scientific thought.

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