cognitivism

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Related to Cognitivist: behaviorist, behaviourism

cognitivism

(ˈkɒɡnɪtɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy the meta-ethical thesis that moral judgments state facts and so are either true or false. Compare emotivism, prescriptivism See also naturalism4, non-naturalism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

cognitivism

[ˈkɒgnɪtɪˌvɪzm] n (Philosophy) → cognitivismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
He describes the controversy as it stands today in terms of institutional context, film theory, assessment of theory, analytic and cognitivist debates, interpretation and filmmaking, and philosophy of art.
Cognitivist? No individual can internalize a total system of language, and this problematizes nativism.
And I also argue how a cognitivist approach is better able to explain this variation, by interpreting contrary representations of the same objects as implicating different ways of knowing and representing these which are available, not just to Nage, but to participants in any culture.
This flurry of scholarly interest is partly a reaction to cognitivist accounts of fiction and emotion that have been found to be inadequate.
To contextualize my approach to impersonal anger, I turn to feminist theories of anger that use a cognitivist approach to emotions and to Woolf's impersonal method, through which she avoids personal narrative, speaks for the collective of the "daughters of educated men" and the Society of Outsiders, and explicitly demonstrates her narrator's imperviousness to emotional appeal.
From a cognitivist perspective, the human mind is conceptualized as a system (Markauskaite & Goodyear, 2017) rather than an unseen intermediary between a stimulus and a response.
"Non-verbal and Multimodal Metaphor in a Cognitivist Framework: Agendas for Research'.' In Forceville, Charles and Eduardo Urios-Aparisi (eds.) Multimodal Metaphor.
His argument takes the form of a critique of Diana Raffman's cognitivist account of musical ineffability (in Language, Musk, and Mind [Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1993]), which argues that musical nuances do not admit of cognitive representation--conceptualization and recall--and are thus inexpressible verbally.
All of them consist of a theoretical part that relies on recent cognitivist and narrative theory (or for the former on some of its precursors), followed by a reading of either selected passages or an entire narrative.
The centrality of affect in human experience and beyond was brought to the attention of contemporary philosophy in Massumi's 1995 groundbreaking The Autonomy of Affect (Massumi, 1995), an essay that sealed the advent of the affective turn after decades of cognitivist and behaviourist dominance.
To to deal with this issue more comprehensively, it is important to borrow ideas from the more pragmatic cognitivist approach especially Dewey's and Ausubel's suggestions about the role of teacher1.
Moreover, Habermas is a moral cognitivist. (73) That is to say, he believes that moral knowledge is possible, insofar as one can know which norms are just by applying the relevant principle of discourse.
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