cogongrass

(redirected from Cogon Grass)

co·gon·grass

or co·gon grass  (kō′gôn-grăs′, -gōn- -gən-, )
n.
A perennial grass (Imperata cylindrica) native chiefly to Southeast Asia and Africa that is used for thatching and is widespread as a weed in warm regions.

[Spanish cogón, from Tagalog kugon.]
References in periodicals archive ?
When the Sison family moved residence to Makati in 1954, Ayala Avenue had only cogon grass on both sides and the lone building was the Nielson Tower which controlled air traffic for the country's first commercial airport.
From Quinagpicangcalahac, we followed a meandering river valley that soon narrowed into dry stream beds bounded by small bamboo, cogon grass and giant fern trees.
Similarly, Cao draws on his own experiences of growing up in the countryside to describe how to harvest and use cogon grass to build a roof, make a necklace out of icicles, weave reeds into shoes and collect arrowhead corms - a tuber sometimes eaten during the Chinese New Year's celebration.
Fojas & Del Rosario [26], pretreated cogon grass using enzyme of 25 FPU/g activity in the range of 24-96 h and reported the maximum reducing sugar (71.
However, Agta villages are becoming more common, with houses made of bamboo and cogon grass providing more permanent dwellings
Garduce describes his first climb as unpleasant because he had to endure a hike that is muddy, stinky as well as the cuts from the tall cogon grass.
Distant Village - Cogon Grass Cuff Top Gift Bags are handmade from Cogon grass fibers with twist handles.
In the kitchen Sue, from Coventry, de-cluttered work surfaces, bought matching pasta jars and co-ordinating vases and put a large bamboo urn with Cogon grass by I the French doors to draw the eye to a view of the garden.
In 2003, herbicides were used to control cogon grass, an invasive species that, if allowed to spread, would render the habitat unusable for the gopher tortoise.
Cogon grass is a species of perennial grass considered an invasive in the United States.
9:00 THE EFFECTS OF COGON GRASS AND NATIVE SHRUBS ON SEED AND BUD BANKS IN A LONG LEAF PINE SAVANNA
It spread quickly because the villas of the resort had roofing made of dried cogon grass, according to Parcellano.