cojones

(redirected from Cojon)

co·jo·nes

 (kə-hō′nāz′, kō-hō′nĕs)
pl.n. Vulgar Slang
1. The testicles.
2.
a. Boldness or courage.
b. Presumptuousness; nerve.

[Spanish, pl. of cojón, testicle, from Vulgar Latin *cōleō*cōleōn-, from Latin cōleī, testicles, perhaps a colloquial variant of *culleī and akin to culleus, leather sack, probably a borrowing from an unknown Indo-European language of the Mediterranean and akin to Greek koluthron, ripe fig (perhaps originally "sacklike thing"), koluthroi, testicles, and koleon, sheath; see coleopteran.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cojones

(koˈxones)
pl n
1. (Anatomy) testicles
2. manly courage
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Es la edicion banal, para no enviar la de lujo que cuesta un cojon.
En el apartado que da nombre a la novela, una abuela le cuenta a su nieto por que desprecio a un pretendiente angloparlante: "He was the foreman, but he disillusioned me because every day at five o'clock when the whistle sound he used to tell me, 'Nelia, cojon, no more work, enough for today, cojon!
"Chanchito", "Chapupo", "Cojon", "Cojon de gato", "Cojon de mico", "Co joton", "Huevo de gato", "Huevo de mico", "Lechoso", "Palo de mico".
Students learned about the cojon, a dram from Brazil, as well as the mandolin (related to the Italian lute), frame drums from the Middle East and Celtic cultures, and the American-created (but African-inspired) banjo.