Colchis


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Related to Colchis: colchicine, Medea

Col·chis

 (kŏl′kĭs)
An ancient region on the Black Sea south of the Caucasus Mountains. It was the site of Jason's legendary quest for the Golden Fleece.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Colchis

(ˈkɒlkɪs)
n
(Placename) an ancient country on the Black Sea south of the Caucasus; the land of Medea and the Golden Fleece in Greek mythology
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Col•chis

(ˈkɒl kɪs)

n.
an ancient country in Asia S of the Caucasus and bordering on the Black Sea: the land of the Golden Fleece and of Medea in Greek legend.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Colchis - (Greek mythology) a region on the Black Sea to the south of the Caucasus that was the site of an ancient country where (according to Greek mythology) Jason sought the Golden Fleece
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
When he reached Colchis Phrixus sacrificed the ram to Zeus.
It originally belonged, it appears, to a Boeotian ram, who had taken on his back two children, when in danger of their lives, and fled with them over land and sea as far as Colchis. One of the children, whose name was Helle, fell into the sea and was drowned.
Why, if you will believe me, they were the sons of that very Phrixus, who, in his childhood, had been carried to Colchis on the back of the golden-fleeced ram.
When the princes understood whither the Argonauts were going, they offered to turn back, and guide them to Colchis. At the same time, however, they spoke as if it were very doubtful whether Jason would succeed in getting the Golden Fleece.
After this (being now under the guidance of the two princes, who were well acquainted with the way), they quickly sailed to Colchis. When the king of the country, whose name was Aetes, heard of their arrival, he instantly summoned Jason to court.
This, as your majesty is aware, is now hanging on a tree here at Colchis; and I humbly solicit your gracious leave to take it away." In spite of himself, the king's face twisted itself into an angry frown; for, above all things else in the world, he prized the Golden Fleece, and was even suspected of having done a very wicked act, in order to get it into his own possession.
It makes a holiday in Colchis whenever such a thing happens.
Unless you set sail from Colchis before to-morrow's sunrise, the king means to burn your fifty-oared galley, and put yourself and your forty-nine brave comrades to the sword.
At the appointed hour you might again have seen Prince Jason and the Princess Medea, side by side, stealing through the streets of Colchis, on their way to the sacred grove, in the center of which the Golden Fleece was suspended to a tree.
Western Georgia for example was known not only as Colchis, but also early on as Egrisi, Chaneti, or Abkhazia (from the late eighth to the eleventh century).
From the deadly battle with the colossal bronze Talos to the deadly crew of the Argos, they are tested to the limits of endurance before reaching the fabled island of Colchis.
The bright are at far right, Colchis Regio, cups around the southern flank of a dark volcanic center called Volund.