common cold

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common cold

n.
See cold.

common cold

n
(Pathology) a mild viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, characterized by sneezing, coughing, watery eyes, nasal congestion, sore throat, etc

cold

(koʊld)

adj. -er, -est,
n., adv. adj.
1. having a relatively low temperature.
2. feeling an uncomfortable lack of warmth; chilled.
3. having a temperature lower than the normal temperature of the human body: cold hands.
4. lacking in passion, enthusiasm, etc.: cold reason.
5. not affectionate or friendly: a cold reply.
6. lacking sensual desire; frigid.
7. depressing; dispiriting.
8. unconscious because of a severe blow, shock, etc.
9. lifeless or extinct; dead.
10. (in games) distant from the object of search or the correct answer.
11. Slang. (in sports and games) not scoring or winning.
12.
b. being a cool color.
13. Metalworking. at a temperature below that at which recrystallization can occur: cold working.
n.
14. the absence of heat or warmth.
15. the sensation produced by loss of heat from the body, as by contact with anything having a lower temperature than that of the body: the cold of a steel door.
16. cold weather.
17. Also called common cold. a respiratory disorder characterized by sneezing, sore throat, coughing, etc., caused by any of various viruses of the rhinovirus group.
adv.
18. with complete competence; thoroughly: He knew his speech cold.
19. without preparation or prior notice.
20. abruptly; unceremoniously.
21. Metalworking. at a temperature below that at which recrystallization can occur (sometimes used in combination): to cold-hammer an iron bar; The wire was drawn cold.
Idioms:
1. catch or take cold, to become afflicted with a cold.
2. (out) in the cold, neglected; ignored; forgotten.
3. throw cold water on, to dampen someone's enthusiasm about.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English cald, ceald, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon cald, Old High German chalt, Old Norse kaldr, Gothic kalds; akin to gelid]
cold′ly, adv.
cold′ness, n.

com·mon cold

(kŏm′ən)
An infection caused by a virus, in which the membranes lining the mouth, nose, and throat become inflamed. Its symptoms are fever, sneezing, and coughing.

common cold

A viral infection that causes inflammation of the respiratory tract lining. It is often accompanied by a runny nose, sore throat, sneezing, and headaches.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.common cold - a mild viral infection involving the nose and respiratory passages (but not the lungs)common cold - a mild viral infection involving the nose and respiratory passages (but not the lungs); "will they never find a cure for the common cold?"
communicable disease - a disease that can be communicated from one person to another
respiratory disease, respiratory disorder, respiratory illness - a disease affecting the respiratory system
head cold - a common cold affecting the nasal passages and resulting in congestion and sneezing and headache
rhinorrhea - persistent watery mucus discharge from the nose (as in the common cold)
Translations
nachlazení
flunssanuhakuumevilustuminen
細菌性の風邪風邪
gripărăceală

common cold

n the common coldil raffreddore
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He recommended some precautionary measures like inhaling steam and drinking green tea everyday to avoid the cold virus.
Cool air in people's nasal cavity is actually more conducive for the common cold virus to multiply than the warm air in the lungs.
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A team led by biochemistry Professor Ann Palmenberg from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, provides a meticulous topographical model of the capsid or protein shell of a cold virus that until 2006 was unknown to science.