Coleman

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Cole·man

 (kōl′mən), Cy Originally Seymour Kaufman. 1929-2004.
American composer whose best known Broadway shows include Sweet Charity (1966) and The Will Rogers Follies (1991).

Coleman

, Ornette 1930-2015.
American jazz saxophonist and composer who established free jazz, an unrestrained improvisational style of jazz.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Coleman

(ˈkəʊlmən)
n
(Biography) Ornette (ɔːˈnɛt). born 1930, US avant-garde jazz alto saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
And I thought that I had not done my duty in leaving you together; so when I had been to Coleman's I came home again.
COLEMAN'S WEEKLY sent Martin a lengthy telegram, costing nearly three hundred dollars, offering him a thousand dollars an article for twenty articles.
Coleman's guilty pleas and the recommended sentence would "scar his life for the rest of his life, and rightfully so."
Ironically, Coleman's successor Lawrie Sanchez reinstated his former Wimbledon team-mate Beasant when he took charge, but there was no way back for Kean who joins Coleman out in the cold.
The meeting is symbolic of Coleman's transition from a top executive at a corporate monolith to founder of a bootstrapping software company.
But a look back at the previous page, transformed by the overlay of the red-on-yellow woman in her Italian frock, makes another pointed juxtaposition: She seems to peer into a painting by Coleman's close ally Robyn Denny, a work that had become something of a manifesto piece in their campaign against the figurative establishment in the painting faculty of the school.
And US officers swooped on Coleman's family home in Pompano Beach, Florida, but found it empty.
Coleman's Black Male Fiction and the Legacy of Caliban appears at a cardinal moment in what some have called the "third renaissance" of African-American literary art.
Miss Coleman's parents had become worried after not being able to contact her.
Chicago-born alto saxophonist Coleman's first Birmingham appearance since he visited twice with Dave Holland's quintet in the mid-1980s presented him in big band mode.
Despite the abundant intelligence presiding over these poems, there is no lack of heart in Wanda Coleman's latest book.
Wolfson's principle is not utterly rash; Coleman's pragmatism doesn't lack principle.