Coleridge


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Cole·ridge

 (kōl′rĭj, kō′lə-rĭj), Samuel Taylor 1772-1834.
British poet and critic who was a leader of the romantic movement. With William Wordsworth he published Lyrical Ballads (1798), which contains "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," his best-known poem.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Coleridge

(ˈkəʊlərɪdʒ)
n
(Biography) Samuel Taylor. 1772–1834, English Romantic poet and critic, noted for poems such as The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), Kubla Khan (1816), and Christabel (1816), and for his critical work Biographia Literaria (1817)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cole•ridge

(ˈkoʊl rɪdʒ, ˈkoʊ lə-)

n.
Samuel Taylor, 1772–1834, English poet, critic, and philosopher.
Cole•ridg′i•an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Coleridge - English romantic poet (1772-1834)Coleridge - English romantic poet (1772-1834)  
lake poets - English poets at the beginning of the 19th century who lived in the Lake District and were inspired by it
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References in classic literature ?
Not Coleridge first threw that spell; but God's great, unflattering laureate, Nature.
So that by no possibility could Coleridge's wild Rhyme have had aught to do with those mystical impressions which were mine, when I saw that bird upon our deck.
But the odes of Keats and of Wordsworth, a poem or two by Coleridge, a few more by Shelley, discovered vast realms of the spirit that none had explored before.
In English philosophy too, many affinities may be traced, not only in the works of the Cambridge Platonists, but in great original writers like Berkeley or Coleridge, to Plato and his ideas.
He was lying back comfortably in a deep arm-chair smoking a cigar, and ruminating the fruitful question as to whether Coleridge had wished to marry Dorothy Wordsworth, and what, if he had done so, would have been the consequences to him in particular, and to literature in general.
Then we come to Wordsworth and Coleridge, Pope, Johnson, Addison, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats.
Coleridge and other English critics at the beginning of the present century had a great deal to say concerning a psychological distinction of much importance (as it appeared to them) between the fancy and the imagination.
One of the greatest of poets, Coleridge was one of the wisest of men, and it was not for nothing that he read us this parable.
Such has Swedenborg, such has Kant, such has Coleridge, such has Hegel or his interpreter Cousin seemed to many young men in this country.
It comes as no surprise, then, that Barron wrote both poetry and horror before turning to crime fiction with 2018's "Blood Standard," a novel that introduced former mob enforcer Isaiah Coleridge. At the start of that violent book, Coleridge appeared to be a predatory machine; but, by its conclusion, he vowed that from then on he would kill only those who have it coming.
IN OCTOBER I797 SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE WROTE TO HIS FRIEND Thomas Poole about how his childhood reading shaped his understanding of the imagination and the limits of empiricism.
Until only 70 years ago poets such as Edgar Alan Poe, WB Yeats, John Keats, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Thomas Hardy were as famous as Ed Sheeran is today - and possibly more so.