collapsar

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collapsar

(kɒˈlæpsɑː)
n
(Astronomy) astronomy a collapsed star, either a white dwarf, neutron star, or black hole
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Some 80 per cent of the heavy elements in the universe likely formed in collapsars, a rare but heavy element-rich form of supernova explosion from the gravitational collapse of old, massive stars typically 30 times as weighty as our sun, said physics professor Daniel Siegel.
Using supercomputers, the trio simulated the dynamics of collapsars, or old stars whose gravity causes them to implode and form black holes.
Sari, "Short versus long and collapsars versus non-collapsars: a quantitative classification of gamma-ray bursts," The Astrophysical Journal, vol.
In the collapsar model [27], LGRBs are only formed by massive stars with Z/[Z.sub.[??]] below [equivalent] 0.1-0.3.
With these, larger-sized neutron stars may be non-observable, because they are gravitational collapsars. Estimate now the minimal value of the mass of the neutron star by the assumption that it collapses.
Firstly, the event horizon belongs to the gravitational and inflation collapsars; secondly, it is between the future and the past, since the observable time at the surface of the collapsar is stopped.
These hypernovae (or collapsars) are dying stars containing 40 times the mass of the Sun.
Central-Engine Models: Millisecond Magnetars versus Collapsars. The main consensus of all GRB models is that LGRBs and their associated SNe arise via the collapse of massive stars, albeit ones endowed with physical properties that must arise only seldom in nature, given the fact GRB-SNe are very rare.
This classification of stars results in three main types: regular stars (covering white dwarfs to super-giants) covered in Chapter 2, of which Wolf-Rayet stars are a subtype, neutron stars and pulsars, covered in Chapter 4 and collapsars (i.e.
Because the Schwarzschild metrics lead to consideration of the state of gravitational collapse, we may suppose that not only regular gravitational collapsars can be considered (the surface of a regular black hole possesses metric properties), but even a much more exotic sort of collapsed objects--a collapsar whose surface cannot be presented with metric geometries.
In addition we consider the range of angles for which light originating at the surface of such a collapsar crosses the photonsphere, at 1.5 times the gravitational radius, and consequently may reach a terrestrial telescope.
According to the popular "collapsar" model--a detailed physical mechanism to explain core-collapse hypernovae developed by Stanford E.