colloid

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col·loid

 (kŏl′oid′)
n.
1. Chemistry
a. A system in which finely divided particles, which are approximately 1 to 1,000 millimicrons in size, are dispersed within a continuous medium in a manner that prevents them from being filtered easily or settled rapidly.
b. The particulate matter so dispersed.
2. The gelatinous stored secretion of the thyroid gland, consisting mainly of thyroglobulin.
3. Gelatinous material resulting from degeneration in diseased tissue.
adj.
Of, relating to, containing, or having the nature of a colloid.

col·loi′dal (kə-loid′l, kŏ-) adj.
col·loi′dal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

colloid

(ˈkɒlɔɪd)
n
1. (Chemistry) Also called: colloidal solution or colloidal suspension a mixture having particles of one component, with diameters between 10–7 and 10–9 metres, suspended in a continuous phase of another component. The mixture has properties between those of a solution and a fine suspension
2. (Chemistry) the solid suspended phase in such a mixture
3. (Chemistry) obsolete a substance that in solution does not penetrate a semipermeable membrane. Compare crystalloid2
4. (Physiology) physiol a gelatinous substance of the thyroid follicles that holds the hormonal secretions of the thyroid gland
adj
5. (Pathology) pathol of or relating to the gluelike translucent material found in certain degenerating tissues
6. (Chemistry) of, denoting, or having the character of a colloid
[C19: from Greek kolla glue + -oid]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

col•loid

(ˈkɒl ɔɪd)

n.
1. a substance made up of small particles (too small to be seen under an optical microscope, yet too big to pass through a semipermeable membrane) that are suspended in and dispersed throughout a solid, liquid, or gaseous medium.
2. a colloidal substance in the body, as a stored secretion.
adj.
3. colloidal.
[1840–50; < Greek kóll(a) glue + -oid]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·loid

(kŏl′oid′)
A mixture in which very small particles of one substance are distributed evenly throughout another substance. The particles are generally larger than those in a solution, and smaller than those in a suspension. Paints, milk, and fog are examples of colloids. Compare solution, suspension.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

colloid

A substance made of very small particles whose size (1-100 nm) is between those of a suspension and those in solution.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colloid - a mixture with properties between those of a solution and fine suspension
silver protein - a colloid preparation of protein (albumin or gelatin) and silver oxide; used in aqueous solution as an antibacterial agent
mixture - (chemistry) a substance consisting of two or more substances mixed together (not in fixed proportions and not with chemical bonding)
dispersed particles, dispersed phase - (of colloids) a substance in the colloidal state
dispersing medium, dispersing phase, dispersion medium - (of colloids) a substance in which another is colloidally dispersed
colloidal gel, gel - a colloid in a more solid form than a sol
colloidal solution, colloidal suspension, sol - a colloid that has a continuous liquid phase in which a solid is suspended in a liquid
emulsion - (chemistry) a colloid in which both phases are liquids; "an oil-in-water emulsion"
silica gel - a porous form of silica that is highly absorbent
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

col·loid

n. coloide, sustancia gelatinosa producida por ciertas formas de degeneración de los tejidos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

colloid

n coloide m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Pete Williams, professor of polymer and colloid chemistry at Glyndwr University, said: "This is a two-year project which started in June 2013 and we've now reached the stage where we've developed a new polymer which is now being tested in personal and home care formulations.
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An Introduction to Clay Colloid Chemistry, Wiley (Inter Science), New York.
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