colloid

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col·loid

 (kŏl′oid′)
n.
1. Chemistry
a. A system in which finely divided particles, which are approximately 1 to 1,000 millimicrons in size, are dispersed within a continuous medium in a manner that prevents them from being filtered easily or settled rapidly.
b. The particulate matter so dispersed.
2. The gelatinous stored secretion of the thyroid gland, consisting mainly of thyroglobulin.
3. Gelatinous material resulting from degeneration in diseased tissue.
adj.
Of, relating to, containing, or having the nature of a colloid.

col·loi′dal (kə-loid′l, kŏ-) adj.
col·loi′dal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

colloid

(ˈkɒlɔɪd)
n
1. (Chemistry) Also called: colloidal solution or colloidal suspension a mixture having particles of one component, with diameters between 10–7 and 10–9 metres, suspended in a continuous phase of another component. The mixture has properties between those of a solution and a fine suspension
2. (Chemistry) the solid suspended phase in such a mixture
3. (Chemistry) obsolete a substance that in solution does not penetrate a semipermeable membrane. Compare crystalloid2
4. (Physiology) physiol a gelatinous substance of the thyroid follicles that holds the hormonal secretions of the thyroid gland
adj
5. (Pathology) pathol of or relating to the gluelike translucent material found in certain degenerating tissues
6. (Chemistry) of, denoting, or having the character of a colloid
[C19: from Greek kolla glue + -oid]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

col•loid

(ˈkɒl ɔɪd)

n.
1. a substance made up of small particles (too small to be seen under an optical microscope, yet too big to pass through a semipermeable membrane) that are suspended in and dispersed throughout a solid, liquid, or gaseous medium.
2. a colloidal substance in the body, as a stored secretion.
adj.
3. colloidal.
[1840–50; < Greek kóll(a) glue + -oid]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

col·loid

(kŏl′oid′)
A mixture in which very small particles of one substance are distributed evenly throughout another substance. The particles are generally larger than those in a solution, and smaller than those in a suspension. Paints, milk, and fog are examples of colloids. Compare solution, suspension.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

colloid

A substance made of very small particles whose size (1-100 nm) is between those of a suspension and those in solution.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colloid - a mixture with properties between those of a solution and fine suspension
silver protein - a colloid preparation of protein (albumin or gelatin) and silver oxide; used in aqueous solution as an antibacterial agent
mixture - (chemistry) a substance consisting of two or more substances mixed together (not in fixed proportions and not with chemical bonding)
dispersed particles, dispersed phase - (of colloids) a substance in the colloidal state
dispersing medium, dispersing phase, dispersion medium - (of colloids) a substance in which another is colloidally dispersed
colloidal gel, gel - a colloid in a more solid form than a sol
colloidal solution, colloidal suspension, sol - a colloid that has a continuous liquid phase in which a solid is suspended in a liquid
emulsion - (chemistry) a colloid in which both phases are liquids; "an oil-in-water emulsion"
silica gel - a porous form of silica that is highly absorbent
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

col·loid

n. coloide, sustancia gelatinosa producida por ciertas formas de degeneración de los tejidos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

colloid

n coloide m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, by themselves, these data assure that our colloidal system is an excellent optothermal transducer.
They are formed in a binary colloidal system where the polyurethane particles are dispersed in a continuous aqueous medium [4, 5].
Abstract The potential of mean force (PMF) is the total free energy of a many-body colloidal system, and consequently it includes all the interactions the colloids experience due to collisions with themselves and with the solvent.
However, in all cases, the [DELTA][S.sup.*.sub.vis] values were gradually increased with the increase of temperature indicating that microscopic droplets scatter much frequently creating disorder arrangement in the colloidal system due to the increase in kinetic energy.
In their colloidal system, the researchers eliminated this pull by shortening the bonds between their particles.
The benefits of Maxemul when used in emulsion polymerization include stability of the colloidal system, protection from water and improved appearance.
One of the most common ways to introduce pigments into a final blend is through the use of a dispersion, which is complex colloidal system.
New and established researchers in pharmaceutical, physical, and biomedical sciences discuss applications of colloids in drug delivery in such terms as controlled release drug delivery, mechanisms of drug release and solubilization in a particular colloidal system, drug targeting, manufacturing particulate products, taste masking, and bioavailability enhancement.
The magnitude of the zeta potential gives an indication of the stability of a colloidal system. A high negative or high positive value ([+ or -] 30 to 60 mV) means good stability, whereas a low value ([+ or -] 0 to 30 mV) means that the system is unstable and likely to flocculate and coagulate.
In order to analyze coagulation and deposition kinetics in a colloidal system, more complete models of particle interactions are required.
As we know, the zeta potential was a very important parameter for nanoparticles or colloidal system because the value gave an indication of the potential stability of the colloidal system.