collop

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col·lop

 (kŏl′əp)
n.
1. A small portion of food or a slice, especially of meat.
2. A roll of fat flesh.

[Middle English.]

collop

(ˈkɒləp)
n
1. (Cookery) a slice of meat
2. a small piece of anything
[C14: of Scandinavian origin; compare Swedish kalops meat stew]

col•lop

(ˈkɒl əp)

n.
1. a small slice or piece, esp. of meat.
2. a fold of flesh.
[1350–1400; Middle English]
References in classic literature ?
Two candles are placed on a table, white bread and baked pasties are displayed by the light, besides choice of venison, both salt and fresh, from which they select collops.
Two of the company, who were dressed in the weather-stained green doublet of foresters, lifted the big pot off the fire, and a third, with a huge pewter ladle, served out a portion of steaming collops to each guest.
All this was novel and strange to the cloister-bred youth; but most interesting of all was the motley circle of guests who sat eating their collops round the blaze.
Alan was in excellent good spirits, much refreshed by his sleep, very hungry, and looking pleasantly forward to a dram and a dish of hot collops, of which, it seems, the messenger had brought him word.
At one, a bell rings, and the stewardess comes down with a steaming dish of baked potatoes, and another of roasted apples; and plates of pig's face, cold ham, salt beef; or perhaps a smoking mess of rare hot collops.
Mum and dad both opted for the pensioners' special, and chose fish with collops which are large potato slices in batter.
Season the collops and place them in a hot frying pan.
But you'll have to search long and hard to equal my favourite: "Medley of passion fruit on a monkfish coulis, nougatine of hake on a trio of lark's bowels and twiddlies of brain, trepanned, seared and lobotomised, and served with medallions of barn owl on a warm mucous salad with thrice- poached Keta caviar surmounted by collops of multicoloured glazed pigeon entrails, on layers of thrice-masticated haggis.
Studies by Hagler and Naranjo turned up a surprise: the native collops beetle, Collops vittatus.
The old custom of collecting collops - free sweets handed out by Meltham shopkeepers to children - on the Monday before Shrove Tuesday continues today.
In North England the typical dish is collops -- fatty pieces of bacon cut up and scrambled in eggs cooked in butter.
So they hooked him down the chimney, and cut him up into collops, and roasted him for their supper.