coloboma

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col·o·bo·ma

 (kŏl′ə-bō′mə)
n. pl. col·o·bo·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
An anomaly of the eye, usually a developmental defect, that often results in some loss of vision.

[New Latin colobōma, from Greek kolobōma, part removed in mutilation, from koloboun, to mutilate, from kolobos, maimed.]

col′o·bo′ma·tous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

coloboma

(ˌkɒləˈbəʊmə)
n
(Pathology) a structural defect of the eye, esp in the choroid, retina, or iris
[C19: New Latin, from Greek kolobōma a part taken away in mutilation, from kolobos cut short]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

col·o·bo·ma

n. coloboma, defecto congénito, patológico o artificial especialmente manifestado en el ojo debido a un cierre incompleto de la fisura óptica;
___ iridis___ del iris;
___ lentis___ del lente;
___ of choroid___ de la coroides;
___ of optic nerve___ del nervio óptico;
___ of vitreous___ del vítreo;
macular ______ macular.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The classification is necessary not only for treatment purpose but also is important for cosmetic purpose, cicatricial retraction, post-traumatic loss of tissue, congenital colobomas. The final diagnoses of these lesions are also important to consider reconstruction techniques with grafts and flap in orbital regions.11
This condition is classified as simple, when presented as an isolated finding, or complex, when accompanied by other malformations such as colobomas, anterior segment dysgenesis, lens abnormalities, and posterior segment anomalies [1].
Entre las principales etiologias que presentan un reflejo rojo alterado, encontramos los cuerpos extranos en pelicula lagrimal, opacidades corneales, alteraciones pupilares que bloqueen el paso de la luz a traves de este orificio, cataratas, opacidades del vitreo y alteraciones retinianas, dentro de las cuales encontramos los tumores retinianos y los colobomas coriorretinianos.
Grinberg et al., "Reciprocal fusion transcripts of two novel Zn-finger genes in a female with absence of the corpus callosum, ocular colobomas and a balanced translocation between chromosomes 2p24 and 9q32," European Journal of Human Genetics, vol.
[11] mention that the most common craniofacial anomalies characteristic of the syndrome include corneal and orbital defects, anencephaly, meningocele or encephalocele, palpebral colobomas, nose malformations, and facial nerve paralysis; in the oral cavity, there may be micrognathism, hyperdontia, and cleft lip with or without cleft palate, representing 14.6% of patients who are afflicted with this condition [12,13].
The classical features of Goldenhar syndrome patients involve ocular anomalies, including microphthalmia, anophthalmia, epibulbar dermoid (or lipodermoid) tumors, and eyelid colobomas, aural defects, such as preauricular tags, anotia, microtia, and hearing loss, vertebral abnormalities, such as scoliosis, hemivertebrae, and cervical fusion, and mandibular hypoplasia [4-6].
Material and Methods: Twenty one eyes (21 patients) that underwent surgery for retinal detachment associated with chorio-retinal colobomas were selected.
Ocular findings include colobomas, oculomotor apraxia, nystagmus, strabismus, ptosis, and abnormal retinal pigmentation.
[1,8] Significant ocular pathology (microphthalmia, colobomas, retinal dysplasia and cataracts) occurs in up to 50% of patients, and sensorineural hearing loss has been reported.
It is generally accepted that the spectrum includes some of the following abnormalities: ear malformations, micrognathia, epibulbar dermoids/lipodermoids and/or colobomas, and vertebral defects.