Colonel Blimp


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Colonel Blimp

n. Chiefly British
A pompous, reactionary, ultranationalistic person.

[After Colonel Blimp, , a cartoon character created by Sir David Low (1891-1963), British political cartoonist.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Colonel Blimp

n
(Military) See blimp2
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Colo′nel Blimp′


n.
an elderly, pompous reactionary.
[1935–40; after a character appearing in cartoons by David Low]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Colonel Blimp - any elderly pompous reactionary ultranationalistic person (after the cartoon character created by Sir David Low)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
extreme right-winger, reactionary, ultraconservative - an extreme conservative; an opponent of progress or liberalism
2.Colonel Blimp - a pompous reactionary cartoon character created by Sir David Low
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elgar was never the character he played throughout life - this sort of pompous, upright Colonel Blimp. That was a mask he needed to rise through the ranks of Edwardian society.
AS ESPRIT DE CORPS' resident Colonel Blimp, an "old Cold War warhorse," an archaic 'death or glory type', I'd like to put a good word for Canada's old armaments makers.
Possibly so, but I'm more exercised Sir Menzies 'Ming' Campbell with the contents than Colonel Blimp's inability to gets his meal sums right.
His popular character Colonel Blimp represented many of the farcical aspects of war.
Seeking draconian punishment (Greek legislator Draco, 7th century BC, imposed the death penalty for minor offences) would be blimpish (Colonel Blimp was a pompous character in David Low cartoons in WW2) or perhaps chauvinist (Nicolas Chauvin, a notoriously patriotic supporter of Napoleon).
Mr Christley has written letters ad nauseam supporting leaving the EU and the Colonel Blimp mentality of Fortress Britain.
Also being presented by is the digital restoration of The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, which was restored by the Academy Film Archive in association with the BFI National Archive, ITV Studios Global Entertainment Ltd., and The Film Foundation.
He provides analysis of the films' ideological themes, plots, actors, and cinematography, and discusses the British obsession with specific events of the war; traits associated with film heroes, including stoicism and personal restraint, understated humor, improvisation, and the underdog mentality; and how these traits added a national ethos in films like Salute John Citizen, Next of Kin, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The Lion Has Wings, A Canterbury Tale, Against the Wind, The Cruel Sea, Reach for the Sky, The Dam Busters, The Coldlitz Story, Carve Her Name with Pride, The Malta Story, The Bridge on the River Kwai, A Bridge Too Far, The English Patient, and Atonement.`
This man is like an old-fashioned Colonel Blimp. He is totally blinkered in his thoughts.
Has no statistics to back up her hilarious Colonel Blimp opinions.
Rhyl Apollo 5 Cinema THE LIFE AND DEATH OF COLONEL BLIMP (U) Major General Clive Wynne-Candy recalls his incredible life so far.
David Low lives on in his ridicule of the Fascist dictators and in Colonel Blimp; Fougasse in his posters ('Ca reless Talk Costs Lives'); and Zec--the other cartoonist cited in Kenneth Baker's foreword-because Churchill took umbrage against one notable Daily Mirror cartoon.