New Spain

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New Spain

A former Spanish viceroyalty (1521-1821) in North America, including the southwest United States, Mexico, Central America north of Panama, and some West Indian islands. It also included the islands of the Philippines.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

New Spain

n
(Historical Terms) a Spanish viceroyalty of the 16th to 19th centuries, composed of Mexico, Central America north of Panama, the Spanish West Indies, the southwestern US, and the Philippines
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

New′ Spain′


n.
a former Spanish viceroyalty (1535–1821) including Central America N of Panama, Mexico, the West Indies, the SW United States, and the Philippines.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scardaville, "(Hapsburg) Law and (Bourbon) Order: State Authority, Popular Unrest, and the Criminal Justice System in Bourbon Mexico City," in Carlos Aguirre and Robert Buffingron, eds., Reconstructing Criminality in Latin America, (Wilmington, 2000), 1-17; Woodrow Borah, Justice by Insurance: The General Indian Court of Colonial Mexico and the Legal Aides of the Half-Real (Berkeley, 1983).
These scholarly papers apply this methodology to life in colonial Mexico, and look at subjects such as sadness, joy, desire, jealousy and anxiety, and their application in pursuits like gambling.
Indigenous writings from the convent; negotiating ethnic autonomy in colonial Mexico.
Through his past work on colonialism in the Andes, his brilliant critique of "world system" analysis, his work on gender in colonial Mexico, and his influence on a generation of graduate students, this author has made an extraordinary imprint on the field of Latin American history.
Land and Society in Colonial Mexico. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1963.
Since then, the only published edition of a Nahuatl play is Burkhart's own (excellent) Holy Wednesday: A Nahua Drama from Early Colonial Mexico (Philadelphia, 1996).
Stern, The Secret History of Gender: Men, Women and Power in Late Colonial Mexico (Chapel Hill, 1995); and Ann Twinam, Public Lives, Private Secrets: Gender, Honor, Sexuality, and Illegitimacy in Colonial Spanish America (Stanford, 1999).
Indigenous miracles; Nahua authority in colonial Mexico.
In the introduction, Offutt argues that this study is significant, because it represents a new trend in the historiography of the northern frontier region of colonial Mexico. However, the author does so in an anemic and outdated historiographic presentation.
Framing the sacred; the Indian churches of early colonial Mexico.
Lewis's anthropological study is an ambitious attempt to examine the interdependent functioning of caste and gender in colonial Mexico. Her lens is witchcraft, a theme of enduring interest to both scholarly and popular readers.
Phelan and Luis Weckmann for colonial Mexico in uncovering cultural ties between the Middle Ages and colonial New Spain.
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