Comanche


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Co·man·che

 (kə-măn′chē)
n. pl. Comanche or Co·man·ches
1. A member of a Native American people formerly ranging over the southern Great Plains from western Kansas to northern Texas and now located in Oklahoma. The Comanche became nomadic buffalo hunters after migrating south from Wyoming in the 18th century.
2. The Uto-Aztecan language of the Comanche.

[Spanish, from Ute kı̷mmanči.]

Co·man′che adj.

Comanche

(kəˈmæntʃɪ)
npl -ches or -che
1. (Peoples) a member of a Native American people, formerly ranging from the River Platte to the Mexican border, now living in Oklahoma
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Shoshonean subfamily of the Uto-Aztecan family

Co•man•che

(kəˈmæn tʃi, koʊ-)

n., pl. -ches, (esp. collectively) -che.
1. a member of a Plains Indian people ranging in the mid-19th century over a large area of the S Great Plains: later confined to a reservation in Oklahoma.
2. the Uto-Aztecan language of the Comanche, closely related to Shoshone.
[1800–10, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Comanche - a member of the Shoshonean people who formerly lived between Wyoming and the Mexican border but are now chiefly in Oklahoma
Shoshone, Shoshoni - a member of the North American Indian people (related to the Aztecs) of the southwestern United States
2.Comanche - the Shoshonean language spoken by the Comanche
Shoshonean, Shoshonean language, Shoshonian, Shoshonian language - a subfamily of Uto-Aztecan languages spoken mainly in the southwestern United States
References in classic literature ?
"Aunt Mildred may have to get another cook, but at any rate we shall have got Comanche."
She turned her head, and so quickly that she saw Comanche fall.
Her horse was back on its haunches, the weight of her body on the reins; but her head was turned and her eyes were on the falling Comanche. He struck the road-bed squarely, with his legs loose and lifeless beneath him.
There was a slight but perceptible rebound from the impact of Comanche's body with the earth.
Her lover was out of the saddle and clear of Comanche, though held to the animal by his right foot, which was caught in the stirrup.
Comanche fetched up hard against an outputting point of rock.
Near the edge of the final wall, Comanche lodged on a buttock of stone.
Still, I was sane enough to notice this detail, to wit: many of the terms used in the most matter-of- fact way by this great assemblage of the first ladies and gentlemen in the land would have made a Comanche blush.
He was the most energetic man I ever saw, think quick as a wink, as cool as an icicle an' as wild as a Comanche. Why, he'd a-cut a swath through the free an' easy big business gamblers an' pirates of them days; just as he cut a swath through the hearts of the ladies when he went gallopin' past on that big horse of his, sword clatterin', spurs jinglin', his long hair fiyin', straight as an Indian, clean-built an' graceful as a blue-eyed prince out of a fairy book an' a Mexican caballero all rolled into one; just as he cut a swath through the Johnny Rebs in Civil War days, chargin' with his men all the way through an' back again, an' yellin' like a wild Indian for more.
The painting of cans being skilled piecework, and paying as much as two dollars a day, Marija burst in upon the family with the yell of a Comanche Indian, and fell to capering about the room so as to frighten the baby almost into convulsions.
"I don't mean that you are a Comanche chief, or that you wear a blanket and feathers.
"But, my dear aunt, she is not, after all, a Comanche savage."