etiquette

(redirected from Common courtesy)
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et·i·quette

 (ĕt′ĭ-kĕt′, -kĭt)
n.
The practices and forms prescribed by social convention or by authority.

[French, from Old French estiquet, label; see ticket.]

etiquette

(ˈɛtɪˌkɛt; ˌɛtɪˈkɛt)
n
1. (Sociology) the customs or rules governing behaviour regarded as correct or acceptable in social or official life
2. (Sociology) a conventional but unwritten code of practice followed by members of any of certain professions or groups: medical etiquette.
[C18: from French, from Old French estiquette label, from estiquier to attach; see stick2]

et•i•quette

(ˈɛt ɪ kɪt, -ˌkɛt)

n.
1. conventional requirements as to proper social behavior.
2. a prescribed code of usage in matters of ceremony: court etiquette.
3. the code of ethical behavior among the members of a profession: medical etiquette.
[1740–50; < French étiquette, Middle French estiquette ticket, memorandum, derivative of estiqu(i)er to attach < Germanic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.etiquette - rules governing socially acceptable behavioretiquette - rules governing socially acceptable behavior
prescript, rule - prescribed guide for conduct or action
protocol - forms of ceremony and etiquette observed by diplomats and heads of state
punctilio - a fine point of etiquette or petty formality

etiquette

noun good or proper behaviour, manners, rules, code, customs, convention, courtesy, usage, protocol, formalities, propriety, politeness, good manners, decorum, civility, politesse, p's and q's, polite behaviour a breach of the rules of diplomatic etiquette

etiquette

noun
Socially correct behavior:
decorum, good form, manner (used in plural), mores, propriety (also used in plural), p's and q's.
Translations
آداب السُّلوك
etiketa
etikettetakt og tone
etiketa
etikett
siîir og siîareglur
etiķete, uzvedības normas

etiquette

[ˈetɪket] Netiqueta f, protocolo m
court etiquette (royal) → ceremonial m de la corte (Jur) → protocolo m de la corte
legal etiquetteética f legal
professional etiquetteética f profesional
etiquette demands thatla etiqueta or el protocolo exige que ...
it is not good etiquetteno está bien visto

etiquette

[ˈɛtɪkɛt] nconvenances fpl, étiquette f
a breach of etiquette → un manquement à l'étiquette

etiquette

nEtikette f; rules of etiquetteVerhaltensregeln pl; a breach of etiquetteein Verstoß mgegen die Etikette; court etiquetteHofetikette f; that’s not in accordance with medical etiquettedas entspricht nicht dem Berufsethos eines Arztes

etiquette

[ˈɛtɪˌkɛt] netichetta
court etiquette (royal) → cerimoniale di corte
medical etiquette → prassi f medica

etiquette

(ˈetiket) noun
rules for correct or polite behaviour between people, or within certain professions. medical/legal etiquette.
References in classic literature ?
Jimmie had an idea it wasn't common courtesy for a friend to come to one's home and ruin one's sister.
She consents, of course, as a matter of common courtesy and common justice," he said.
There she was again, not a minute after I had left her, placed purposely in a position which made it a matter of common courtesy on the part of the clergyman to bow to her for a second time.
Public vehicles like jeepneys, taxis, trains, ships and airplanes are also included in this regulation since it is simply common courtesy and proper consideration to other passengers.
No, she abandoned common courtesy and common sense," Sheen noted.
An Arriva spokesman said: "Whilst we do not have a formal policy on priority seating for pregnant women, we would encourage our customers, out of common courtesy, to give up their seat to pregnant women"
And in the end, nothing the council can do will be a substitute for common sense and common courtesy at holiday celebrations.
FORMER Aussie opener Matthew Hayden has lashed out at his successor David Warner for failing to use common courtesy in Cardiff.
I understand the need for vigilance completely but common courtesy and manners is not too much to ask for," he tweeted.
The breakdown of government and common courtesy is represented well, while Crewe still sows a seed of hope for the future.
But then wouldn't common courtesy suggest he could reply to a civilised and reasonable enquiry affecting thousands of people?
To summarise, I am a pensioner who has never claimed sickness or any other benefit and resent being told what to do by a council representative who has no idea of my personal circumstances and hasn't even had the common courtesy to try and find out.