pleading

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plead·ing

 (plē′dĭng)
n.
1. A plea; an entreaty.
2. Law A formal statement, usually written, setting forth the cause of action or the defense of a party to a lawsuit.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pleading

(ˈpliːdɪŋ)
n
1. (Law) the act of presenting a case in court, as by a lawyer on behalf of his client
2. (Law) the art or science of preparing the formal written statements of the parties to a legal action. See also pleadings
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

plead•ing

(ˈpli dɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of a person who pleads.
2.
a. a formal, usu. written statement setting forth the cause of action or defense of a case.
b. the skill or practice of setting forth pleas in legal causes.
c. the advocating of a cause in a court of law.
[1250–1300]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pleading - (law) a statement in legal and logical form stating something on behalf of a party to a legal proceedingpleading - (law) a statement in legal and logical form stating something on behalf of a party to a legal proceeding
bill of Particulars - the particular events to be dealt with in a criminal trial; advises the defendant and the court of the facts the defendant will be required to meet
affirmative pleading - any defensive pleading that affirms facts rather than merely denying the facts alleged by the plaintiff
alternative pleading, pleading in the alternative - a pleading that alleges facts so separate that it is difficult to determine which facts the person intends to rely on
answer - the principal pleading by the defendant in response to plaintiff's complaint; in criminal law it consists of the defendant's plea of `guilty' or `not guilty' (or nolo contendere); in civil law it must contain denials of all allegations in the plaintiff's complaint that the defendant hopes to controvert and it can contain affirmative defenses or counterclaims
charge, complaint - (criminal law) a pleading describing some wrong or offense; "he was arrested on a charge of larceny"
complaint - (civil law) the first pleading of the plaintiff setting out the facts on which the claim for relief is based
defective pleading - any pleading that fails to conform in form or substance to minimum standards of accuracy or sufficiency
demurrer - (law) any pleading that attacks the legal sufficiency of the opponent's pleadings
rebuttal, rebutter - (law) a pleading by the defendant in reply to a plaintiff's surrejoinder
replication - (law) a pleading made by a plaintiff in reply to the defendant's plea or answer
rejoinder - (law) a pleading made by a defendant in response to the plaintiff's replication
special pleading - (law) a pleading that alleges new facts in avoidance of the opposing allegations
surrebuttal, surrebutter - (law) a pleading by the plaintiff in reply to the defendant's rebutter
surrejoinder - (law) a pleading by the plaintiff in reply to the defendant's rejoinder
statement - a message that is stated or declared; a communication (oral or written) setting forth particulars or facts etc; "according to his statement he was in London on that day"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Adj.1.pleading - beggingpleading - begging        
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pleading

[ˈpliːdɪŋ]
A. N (= entreaties) → súplicas fpl (Jur) → alegatos mpl
special pleadingargumentos mpl especiosos
B. ADJ [tone etc] → suplicante, de súplica
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pleading

[ˈpliːdɪŋ]
adj [expression, eyes, voice] → implorant(e)
n (= entreaty) → imploration f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pleading

nBitten nt; (Jur) → Plädoyer nt
adj look, voiceflehend
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pleading

[ˈpliːdɪŋ]
1. n (entreaties) → suppliche fpl
2. adjsupplichevole
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
It does not address topics like service of process, interpleader, historical materials on common law pleading, discovery mechanisms, default judgments, voluntary and involuntary dismissal, execution of judgments, and trial.
Common law pleading had the further function of controlling the
Indeed, the Federal Rules were designed to go easy on plaintiffs: one of the motivations behind their adoption in 1938 was to eradicate the treacherous technicalities of common law pleading and replace them with a "liberal" regime called "notice pleading." (12) Under this notice-pleading regime, plaintiffs were required only to plead enough to put the defendant on fair notice of what the plaintiff's claim was about (13)--i.e., just as many factual allegations as necessary to enable the defendant to file an answer to the complaint and prepare for discovery.
courts, which in turn derived from common law pleading. (102) Thus,