Comintern

(redirected from Communist International)
Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Com·in·tern

 (kŏm′ĭn-tûrn′)
n.
An association of Communist parties of the world, established in 1919 by Lenin and dissolved in 1943.

[Russian komintern, abbreviation of Kommunisticheskiĭ Internatsional, Communist International.]

Comintern

(ˈkɒmɪnˌtɜːn) or

Komintern

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) short for Communist International: an international Communist organization founded by Lenin in Moscow in 1919 and dissolved in 1943; it degenerated under Stalin into an instrument of Soviet politics. Also called: Third International

Third′ Interna′tional


n.
an ultraradical organization (1919–43) formed to unite Communist groups of various countries. Also called Comintern.

Comintern

1919–43, an international Communist organization to promote revolutionary Marxism, also called Communist International and Third International. It was founded by Lenin and used by Stalin as a political instrument.
Translations

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪntɜːn] N ABBR (Pol) =Communist InternationalComintern f

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪntɜːrn] nKomintern m

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪnˌtɜːn] nKOMINTERN m
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Horace Greeley was the publisher of the New York Tribune and a member of the Communist International. He even hired Karl Marx, the author of The Communist Manifesto, as a European correspondent.
Addressing what was entailed in the Party and its members advocating for and affiliating with the Communist International (Comintern) is obviously important and, depending on the period, this means coming to grips with the meaning of Stalinism.
A couple of days earlier, a relatively small bunch of delegates, mostly from across Europe, had decided to form the Third International, subsequently commonly known as the Comintern, an abbreviation of Communist International. It was intended as a substitute for the Second, or Socialist, International, which in the eyes of the more radical revolutionaries had effectively lost its raison d'etre when all too many of its constituent parties humiliated themselves by subscribing to the nationalist passions that led much of Europe into a bloodbath.
The book reveals the secret confrontation between Mao and Chiang, and between British intelligence and Communist International (Comintern) agents in China; ChiangAEs plot against the allies, and the Japanese; the alliesAE bid to turn nationalist China against the Japanese, and the secret negotiations of Chiang with Nazi Germany, and with Japan, whose forces he employed against the CCP once World War II was over.
During 1931, he attended the International Lenin School in Moscow, operated by the Communist International, with the intent of developing communist cadres across the globe through the study of economics and history and Marxist theory.
His objective is certainly not to build a right-wing alternative to the Soviet federation and the Communist International. Leading European right-wing nationalists such as Jerome Riviere of the French National Rally (the recently renamed National Front) have rejected that idea outright.
For example, chapter four, titled "Internationalizing the Party Idea," starts with the Second Congress of the Communist International (Comintern) in 1920, and its decision to change the names of all parties to explicitly flag themselves as communists to distinguish themselves from social democratic forces.
As Communist International documents retrieved after the fall of the Soviet Union show, the Bolsheviks funneled several million dollars, an amount that dwarfs in inflation-adjusted dollars what the Russians allegedly spent on internet ads during the 2016 campaign, into the fledgling Communist movement in the United States in 1919 and 1920.
Throughout, the volume examines how resultant tensions between Communist universalist ambitions, the Moscow-centric policies of the Communist International (Comintern), and the ambivalent pull of Jewish ethnic and national identity structured the development of the Jewish Communist movement globally.
During Labour's first minority government in 1924, the Daily Mail and other right-wing papers published the Zinoviev letter from the head of the Communist International in Moscow, claiming to call for British communists to prepare for revolution.
In 1928 and 1930 the Communist International did a major study of the plight of Black people in the U.S.
Roy attended the Second Congress of the Communist International. The formation of the party in Tashkent was followed by initiatives by party sympathisers outside India to connect with activists such as Muzaffar Ahmad, S.A.