complex conjugate

(redirected from Complex conjugation)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Complex conjugation: Real part, Complex conjugacy

complex conjugate

n.
Either one of a pair of complex numbers whose real parts are identical and whose imaginary parts differ only in sign; for example, 6 + 4i and 6 - 4i are complex conjugates.

complex conjugate

n
(Mathematics) maths the complex number whose imaginary part is the negative of that of a given complex number, the real parts of both numbers being equal: a ib is the complex conjugate of a +ib.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.complex conjugate - either of two complex numbers whose real parts are identical and whose imaginary parts differ only in sign
complex number, complex quantity, imaginary, imaginary number - (mathematics) a number of the form a+bi where a and b are real numbers and i is the square root of -1
References in periodicals archive ?
This implies that the complex conjugation lies in the conjugacy class of [tau].
The tautological bundle over BU(n) is the universal Real bundle of rank n, and the tautological bundle over BU is a universal stable bundle, where the conjugation on the base space is induced by complex conjugation on the coefficients of complex matrices (see for instance [14] for an explicit proof of this fact).
which defines different classes of generalized analytical functions depending on the coefficients A = A (z), B = B (z) and F = F (z), is not a linear equation, because the unknown function is under the sign of complex conjugation. For the canonical Vekua equation [??]W/d[bar.z] = [bar.W] + F (z), we observed that is not linear; so, we came to the idea to explore if it can be solved when we know the general solution of the basic Vekua equation.
Here is certainly the time to introduce the Argand diagram, and the notation of writing numbers as complex exponentials, along with Euler's identity, complex conjugation and roots of unity; though now students can put to rest any shaky foundations they may have had in this area.
He astutely analyzes, for example, Elaw's complex conjugation of "to sing" in a riveting description of her sister's death (not by chance a heavily sentimental scene) and Sojourner Truth's development of some fourteen extant songs and hymns.
[6, Corollary 7], and (iii) the complex conjugation acting on several objects associated to the base field F.