compound sentence

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compound sentence

Compound sentences are one of the four main sentence structures. They are made up of at least two independent clauses expressing closely related ideas of equal or similar importance that are joined using a conjunction and/or punctuation. By using compound sentences, we can add variety to our writing and speech and avoid the repetitive sound of multiple simple sentences.
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compound sentence

n.
A sentence of two or more coordinate independent clauses, often joined by a conjunction or conjunctions, as The problem was difficult, but I finally found the answer.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

compound sentence

n
(Grammar) a sentence containing at least two coordinate clauses
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

com′pound sen′tence


n.
a sentence containing two or more coordinate independent clauses, usu. joined by one or more conjunctions, but no dependent clause, as The lightning flashed (independent clause) and (conjunction) the rain fell (independent clause).
[1765–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compound sentence - a sentence composed of at least two coordinate independent clauses
sentence - a string of words satisfying the grammatical rules of a language; "he always spoke in grammatical sentences"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the non-simple sentences, a differentiation is normally made among sentences which have a coordination of two or more independent clauses (compound sentences) as in sentence (2), sentences which have a subordination of one or more dependent clauses to a main clause (complex sentences) as in sentence (3) and sentences which have a coordination of two or more independent clauses and a subordination of one or more dependent clauses (Compound complex sentences) as in sentence (4) (Quirk et al.
She spent her evenings studying in fluorescent-lit classrooms, trying to grasp the difference between complex and compound sentences. Though it seemed like a far-fetched dream when she was 16, Atiqa managed to complete her education and graduate.
The focus may be, for example, to enrich meaning by including noun or verb phrases, or to include compound sentences in their writing.
Second, if understanding truth-functionally compound sentences requires knowing their truth conditions, which, in turn, requires knowing they are true iff various atomic sentences or propositions are true (or false), then mastery of the "ideal" language of the Tractatus requires knowing pseudo-propositions.
Such conventions included noun groups, compound sentences and pronoun reference, all of which were a part of my school's English units for the year.
Darker olive mosses drape their tapestry from boughs, while a greenish-yellow creeper covers the largest branches like evening gloves." Two compound sentences, four fabulously active verbs--beard, pierce, drape, cover--followed by a simile that adds to the reader's understanding without drawing attention to the writer.
The third section is focused on enhancing the fundamentals through verb and noun phrases, simple, complex, and compound sentences, and a variety of other means.
But, whatever else we can say about Conrad's punctuation, he rarely punctuates in this staccato fashion--and certainly not at this stage of his career, when light-touch punctuation--even inadequate punctuation--ensures the free-flowing rhythms of his prose, marked by expansive compound sentences. Thus, while it may be necessary to add punctuation to Conrad's manuscript--because, to repeat, that of An Outcast is under-punctuated and certainly needs repointing and correction so as to avoid distracting idiosyncrasies that reflect merely the moment of inscription--any intrusiveness must needs be addressed with caution.
Dougy speaks largely in simple or compound sentences. For example: He never used to give any to Mum//so what's Gracey on about?
In the context of writing a counter argument, students were taught the different emphases created by using coordinating conjunctions in compound sentences and subordinating conjunctions in complex sentences:
Other hints for achieving simplicity would comprise: redundancy should be eliminated; clauses should be condensed to phrases and phrases to words; introductory clauses should be eliminated; single point simple sentences should be used; compound sentences should be avoided and longer sentences should be divided into two or more; and needless words should be omitted.
They include complex compound sentences, numerous embeddings, nominal groups with post-modifiers, adverbials and adverbial clauses in unusual positions, etc.