Missouri Compromise

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Related to Compromise of 1820: Compromise of 1850
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Noun1.Missouri Compromise - an agreement in 1820 between pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions in the United States concerning the extension of slavery into new territoriesMissouri Compromise - an agreement in 1820 between pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions in the United States concerning the extension of slavery into new territories
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References in periodicals archive ?
Useful sidebars come every few pages, providing more context on historical figures or events as they arise in the main narrative, from Seward and Douglass to the Wilmot Proviso and the Compromise of 1820. This Noble Woman is valuable in its coverage of the Civil War era and the history of education in the United States, and Myrtilla Miner emerges as a figure more people should know about.
In this well-written, thoughtful, and intensely researched book, Hall has told us all about it in what now must be considered one of the best books written on that hard-won Compromise of 1820.
Hall, an attorney, independent scholar, and writer, integrates the story of the Missouri Compromise with the biography of Jesse Burgess Thomas (1777-1853), who was a junior senator from Illinois during the Missouri controversy over the issue of slavery in the newly acquired lands of the Louisiana Purchase and handled the negotiations that led to the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Hall discusses the sectional tensions in the three decades that led up to the Missouri Compromise, the period in which it was formed and implemented, and its evolution until its repeal in 1854.
Halfway to everything, neither truly North nor South, and neither East nor West, this state best illustrated its political and geographic ambivalence through the Missouri Compromise of 1820. The agreement allowed for Missouri's entry to the Union, but as a slave state.
One may mark it by two of the most important statutes in American history--the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 and the Missouri Compromise of 1820. The Northwest Ordinance brought the territory that became Michigan and other states into the Union, and it was the first time that a government like ours, ours being the first such government, had grown.
This spring marks the 160th anniversary of the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which repealed the Missouri Compromise of 1820 and opened the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, previously closed to slavery, to the possibility that those territories and states evolving from them could be slave.
Until the 1850's, with the important exceptions of the Missouri Compromise of 1820 and the admittance of Texas into the Union in 1845, the central issue dividing the country was the tariff.