Compton effect


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Compton effect

n.
The increase in wavelength of electromagnetic radiation, especially of an x-ray or a gamma-ray photon, scattered by an electron.

[After Arthur Holly Compton.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Compton effect

(ˈkɒmptən)
n
(General Physics) a phenomenon in which a collision between a photon and a particle results in an increase in the kinetic energy of the particle and a corresponding increase in the wavelength of the photon
[C20: named after Arthur Holly Compton ]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
We could conceive of a wind of particles that sweeps the remnant undulating energy in the vacuum of the universe in something like the Compton effect and brings it back to the denser parts of the universe to enrich the galactic gas and nebulae where new stars are formed.
In August 1946, Teller and others produced a paper, "Ignition of the Atmosphere with Nuclear Bombs," citing the Compton Effect as a significant factor in reducing the risk of atmospheric ignition, acting as a backup if the other internal processes expected to defeat a runaway chain reaction proved ineffective:
I almost hate to elaborate on it for fear of diminishing its genuine drama, but I have to dwell a bit on the discovery for which Compton is chiefly known and for which he won the Nobel Prize, the so-called "Compton Effect." (7)
High-energy x rays interact with the material via the Compton effect, which relates to density.

Full browser ?