hijab

(redirected from Compulsory Veiling)
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Related to Compulsory Veiling: Haajib

hi·jab

 (hĭ-jäb′)
n.
1. Any of several cloth head coverings worn by Muslim women.
2. The veiling of women in some Islamic societies, customarily practiced in order to maintain standards of modesty.

[Arabic ḥijāb, cover, curtain, veil, from ḥajaba, to cover; see ḥgb in Semitic roots.]

hijab

(hɪˈdʒæb; hɛˈdʒɑːb) or

hejab

n
1. (Islam) a covering for the head and face, worn by Muslim women
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a covering for the head and face, worn by Muslim women
[from Arabic, literally: curtain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hijab - a headscarf worn by Muslim womenhijab - a headscarf worn by Muslim women; conceals the hair and neck and usually has a face veil that covers the face
headscarf - a kerchief worn over the head and tied under the chin
2.hijab - the custom in some Islamic societies of women dressing modestly outside the home; "she observes the hijab and does not wear tight clothing"
custom, usage, usance - accepted or habitual practice
Translations
hidjabhijab
hidsjabhijab
References in periodicals archive ?
Last week, Amnesty International demanded her release, "renewing its calls on the Iranian authorities to end the persecution of women who speak out against compulsory veiling, and abolish this discriminatory and humiliating practice.
compulsory veiling laws, such as in Iran and Saudi Arabia, can lead to a decline in religiosity .
Compulsory veiling was one of the main steps toward this purification.
The result has been polygamy, honour killing, genital mutilation, forced marriage, an obsession with virginity, compulsory veiling and the persecution of unwed mothers.
This group has sought to introduce compulsory veiling for female teachers, permission for women to wear the niqab on campus, and even the introduction of separate classes for men and women.
However the Constituent Assembly is already facing serious challenges in the form of a small group using violence as it seeks to impose its vision of society on academic institutions, such as compulsory veiling for female teachers, allowing women to wear the niqab on campus and even separate classes for men and women.
Of course, the state-imposed compulsory veiling of women, under the mujjahedin regime and later on, the Taliban, has made of the chadari an instrument for controlling women's presence in the public domain together with a symbol of masculine domination.