Comstock Lode


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Comstock Lode

A rich vein of gold and silver discovered in 1859 at Virginia City in western Nevada. Because of wasteful mining techniques, it was largely abandoned by 1898.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Comstock Lode

(ˈkʌmˌstɒk; ˈkɒm-)
n
(Mining & Quarrying) an extensive gold and silver vein in W Nevada, near Virginia City
[C19: named after T. P. Comstock (1820–70), American prospector]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Com′stock Lode`


n.
a rich deposit of silver and gold ore: discovered in 1859 by Henry T. P. Comstock near Virginia City, Nev.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within this trend, numerous gold, silver, and copper mines are located, notably the historic Comstock Lode mines in Virginia City.
Ten years later, Emanuel moved to Virginia City, Nevada, where the huge Comstock Lode had just been discovered.
Second only to the Comstock Lode in Nevada historical silver production, Tonopah and nearby Goldfield were together responsible for restoring Nevada's mining industry in the early 20th Century.
Carson City prospered following the discovery of gold and silver in the nearby Comstock Lode in 1859, and became Nevada's state capital in 1864.
This volume collects 48 previously uncollected letters and two related feature works of Dan De Quille (William Wright), who wrote The Big Bonanza, a history of the Comstock Lode published in 1876.
The city's story did not end when the Comstock Lode played out.
The symbol of the 25th anniversary is silver, so it is appropriate that we will be in Reno, Nevada, the "Silver State," and land of the Comstock Lode. I know NAI staff and the Workshop committee are planning special anniversary-related surprises.
They chronicle their travels across Mexico by land and water to San Francisco, the Sierra foothills, and Nevada's Gold Canyon, where they found silver near the nigh-legendary Comstock Lode. The letters reveal in detail the challenges and hardships of mining life, and their efforts to find their fortune, but their quest was ultimately doomed to end in tragedy; one brother accidentally struck his foot with a pickaxe and died form infection, and barely a few weeks later the other brother succumbed to severe frostbite.
Settlers soon followed, harvesting timber and cutting roads to such mining regions as the Comstock Lode, all in total disregard of the region's ecosystem: their emphasis was on making money from the bountiful natural resources.
Clemens--who first took on the nom de plume Mark Twain in Virginia City--praised Sutro and his plan to tunnel "through the Comstock Lode from end-to-end at a depth of two thousand feet," as he wrote in a footnote to his 1872 book Roughing It.
It's a veritable Comstock Lode of Sagebrush State Jewry.