cover-up

(redirected from Conceal evidence)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

cov·er-up

or cov·er·up (kŭv′ər-ŭp′)
n.
1. An effort or strategy of concealment, especially a planned effort to prevent something potentially scandalous from becoming public.
2. A loose garment for wear over other clothing, such as a swimsuit or an evening dress.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cover-up

n
concealment or attempted concealment of a mistake, crime, etc
vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to cover completely
2. (when: intr, often foll by for) to attempt to conceal (a mistake or crime): she tried to cover up for her friend.
3. (Boxing) (intr) boxing to defend the body and head with the arms
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cov′er-up`



n.
1. any action, stratagem, or other means of concealing or preventing investigation or exposure.
2. any of various women's outer garments, as a loose blouse or caftan.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cover-up - concealment that attempts to prevent something scandalous from becoming publiccover-up - concealment that attempts to prevent something scandalous from becoming public
concealing, hiding, concealment - the activity of keeping something secret
blue wall, blue wall of silence, wall of silence - the secrecy of police officers who lie or look the other way to protect other police officers; "the blue wall cracked when some officers refused to take part in the cover-up"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cover-up

noun concealment, conspiracy, whitewash (informal), complicity, front, smoke screen, smoke and mirrors He denied there'd been any cover-up of the fraud.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

cover-up

[ˈkʌvərʌp] Nencubrimiento m
there's been a cover-upestán tratando de encubrir el asunto
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cover-up

nVertuschung f, → Verschleierung f; the Watergate cover-updie Vertuschung von Watergate
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cover-up

[ˈkʌvərˌʌp] noccultamento (di informazioni)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cover

(ˈkavə) verb
1. to put or spread something on, over or in front of. They covered (up) the body with a sheet; My shoes are covered in paint.
2. to be enough to pay for. Will 10 dollars cover your expenses?
3. to travel. We covered forty miles in one day.
4. to stretch over a length of time etc. His diary covered three years.
5. to protect. Are we covered by your car insurance?
6. to report on. I'm covering the race for the local newspaper.
7. to point a gun at. I had him covered.
noun
1. something which covers, especially a cloth over a table, bed etc. a table-cover; a bed-cover; They replaced the cover on the manhole.
2. something that gives protection or shelter. The soldiers took cover from the enemy gunfire; insurance cover.
3. something that hides. He escaped under cover of darkness.
ˈcoverage (-ridʒ) noun
1. the amount of protection given by insurance. insurance coverage.
2. the extent of the inclusion of items in a news report etc. The TV coverage of the Olympic Games was extensive.
ˈcovering noun
My car has a covering of dirt.
ˈcover-girl noun
a girl pictured on a magazine cover.
ˈcover story noun
the main story in a magazine that goes with a picture on the front cover.
ˈcover-up noun
an attempt to hide or conceal (something illegal or dishonest).
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Galbraith, 30, also faces two charges of trying to defeat justice by setting fire to the home to conceal evidence and lying to police by claiming two intruders shot her husband and raped her.
Tried to obstruct justice by "engaging in a pattern of activity to conceal evidence" regarding his relationship with Ms Lewinsky from the judicial process in the Jones case
But he dismissed any suggestion there was a plan to conceal evidence.
It is feared the man's tent may also have been burned in the campfire together with other items to conceal evidence of a crime.
Somchai is accused of premeditated murder of Mr Lloyd; killing Ms Arscott with intent to conceal evidence; possession of an unlicensed gun; and carrying a weapon in a public place.
The top financial regulator said Kokusai Securities, the fifth largest brokerage house in Japan, violated the Securities and Exchange Law by offering special profits to certain customers in an inappropriate manner and attempting to conceal evidence related to the deals during an inspection.
Mr Blair denied the prosecution was ditched to conceal evidence questioning the legality of the war.
On Monday, the Financial Services Agency (FSA) ordered Kokusai Securities to suspend operations at all of its offices for three days from July 4 because workers at its Osaka and Oita branches violated the Securities and Exchange Law by offering special profits to certain customers in an inappropriate manner and attempting to conceal evidence of the deals.
Asked about the Simpsons' concerns that the police may have tried to conceal evidence during their inquiry, Mr Power replied: "I think we have got as near to the truth as anybody is going to get."
Prosecutors are now investigating whether he committed perjury and also conspired with Ms Lewinsky and other s to conceal evidence of the relationship.
The Iraqis had also bulldozed many areas to conceal evidence of chemical weapons.
''I did not conceal evidence. I trust my wife,'' Furukawa told reporters after the questioning.