conduction

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con·duc·tion

 (kən-dŭk′shən)
n.
The transmission or conveying of something through a medium or passage, especially the transmission of electric charge or heat through a conducting medium without perceptible motion of the medium itself.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conduction

(kənˈdʌkʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) the transfer of energy by a medium without bulk movement of the medium itself: heat conduction; electrical conduction; sound conduction. Compare convection1
2. (Physiology) the transmission of an electrical or chemical impulse along a nerve fibre
3. the act of conveying or conducting, as through a pipe
4. (General Physics) physics another name for conductivity1
conˈductional adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•duc•tion

(kənˈdʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of conducting, as of water through a pipe.
2.
a. the transfer of heat between two parts of a stationary system at different temperatures.
3. the carrying of sound waves, electrons, heat, or nerve impulses by a nerve or other tissue.
[1530–40; < Latin]
con•duc′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·duc·tion

(kən-dŭk′shən)
The flow of energy, such as heat or an electric charge, through a substance. In heat conduction, the energy flows by direct contact of the substance's molecules with each other. Although the molecules vibrate, they do not change position in the transfer of energy. In electrical conduction, energy flows by the movement of electrons or ions.
Did You Know? Heat is a form of energy that results in the motion of molecules. Heat travels by conduction, convection, or radiation. In conduction, heat spreads through a solid by making its molecules vibrate faster. As faster molecules bump slower ones, the slower ones are made to vibrate faster, and the solid becomes hotter. This is how the handle of a teaspoon sticking out of a cup of hot tea eventually gets hot. When liquids and gases are heated, their molecules, which are free to move about, move farther apart. The hotter portions of the liquid or gas expand, become less dense, and rise, and cooler portions move down to take their place. This movement causes the liquid or gas to circulate in the process called convection. The currents of the ocean are convection currents caused by the uneven heating of the ocean waters by the sun. Radiation carries heat in the form of waves through space. A hot object, like the hot wire in a heat lamp, gives off energy waves called infrared rays. When these rays strike an object, its molecules absorb the rays' energy and vibrate or move faster, and so the object becomes hotter. The sunlight that warms your face has traveled through 93 million miles of space by radiation.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conduction

1. The transfer of heat from molecule to molecule.
2. The flow of electrons from atom to atom through a conductor.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conduction - the transmission of heat or electricity or sound
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
electrical conduction - the passage of electricity through a conductor
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
تَوْصيلُ الحَرارَه
vedení
ledning
johtuminen
kondukcija
hõvezetés
varmaleiîing
konduksjonledning
iletim

conduction

[kənˈdʌkʃən] N (Elec) → conducción f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

conduction

[kənˈdʌkʃən] n (ELECTRICITY, ELECTRONICS) [heat, electricity] → conduction f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

conduction

n (Phys, Physiol) → Leitung f (→ along durch or (Physiol) → entlang)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

conduction

[kənˈdʌkʃn] n (Elec, Phys) → conduzione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

conduct

(kənˈdakt) verb
1. to lead or guide. We were conducted down a narrow path by the guide; He conducted the tour.
2. to carry or allow to flow. Most metals conduct electricity.
3. to direct (an orchestra, choir etc).
4. to behave (oneself). He conducted himself well at the reception.
5. to manage or carry on (a business).
(ˈkondakt) noun
1. behaviour. His conduct at school was disgraceful.
2. the way in which something is managed, done etc. the conduct of the affair.
conducted tour noun
conˈduction (-ʃən) noun
transmission of heat etc by a conductor.
conˈductor noun
1. a thing that conducts heat or electricity. Copper is a good conductor of heat.
2. a director of an orchestra, choir etc.
3. (feminine conˈductress) a person who collects fares on a bus etc. a bus conductor.
4. (American) a guard on a train.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

conduction

n conducción f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.